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Overview Chapter 7: The rising importance of migrants for childbearing in Europe

Author

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  • Tomáš Sobotka

    (Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital (IIASA, VID/ÖAW, WU))

Abstract

This contribution looks at the influence of immigration on childbearing trends in the countries of Western, Northern and Southern Europe, which have received relatively large numbers of immigrants during the last decades. It analyses the contribution of migrants to the total number of births and compares fertility rates of migrant women with the fertility rates of native women, pointing out huge diversity between migrant groups. It also discusses the evidence regarding the progressive ‘assimilation’ in migrants’ fertility to the local fertility patterns and analyses the net impact of migrants on period fertility rates. This review reveals that migrant women typically retain substantially higher levels of period fertility than the ‘native’ populations, but this difference typically diminishes over time and with the duration of their stay in a country. Immigrants contribute substantially to the total number of births and their share of total births has increased in the last decade, exceeding in some countries one fifth of the recorded live births. However, the ‘net effect’ of the higher fertility of migrants on the period total fertility of particular countries remains relatively small, typically between 0.05 and 0.10 in absolute terms.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomáš Sobotka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 7: The rising importance of migrants for childbearing in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(9), pages 225-248, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:19:y:2008:i:9
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol19/9/19-9.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nadja Milewski, 2007. "First child of immigrant workers and their descendants in West Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(29), pages 859-896, December.
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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:7:p:1093-:d:102392 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Allan Puur & Leen Rahnu & Liili Abuladze & Luule Sakkeus & Sergei Zakharov, 2017. "Childbearing among first- and second-generation Russians in Estonia against the background of the sending and host countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(41), pages 1209-1254, April.
    3. Anja Vatterrott, 2015. "Socialisation or Institutional Context: What Determines the First and Second Birth Behaviour of East–West German Migrants?," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 31(4), pages 383-415, October.
    4. Hampshire, Katherine R. & Blell, Mwenza T. & Simpson, Bob, 2012. "‘Everybody is moving on’: Infertility, relationality and the aesthetics of family among British-Pakistani Muslims," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(7), pages 1045-1052.
    5. Nadja Milewski & Hill Kulu, 2014. "Mixed Marriages in Germany: A High Risk of Divorce for Immigrant-Native Couples," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 89-113, February.
    6. Anja Vatterrott, 2011. "The fertility behaviour of East to West German migrants," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    7. Christian Dustmann & Giovanni Facchini & Cora Signorotto, 2015. "Population, Migration, Ageing and Health: A Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1518, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    8. Gunnar Andersson & Ognjen Obućina & Kirk Scott, 2015. "Marriage and divorce of immigrants and descendants of immigrants in Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(2), pages 31-64, July.
    9. Barbara S. Okun & Shlomit Kagya, 2012. "Fertility Change among Post-1989 Immigrants to I srael from the F ormer S oviet U nion," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 792-827, December.
    10. Binder, Pauline & Johnsdotter, Sara & Essén, Birgitta, 2012. "Conceptualising the prevention of adverse obstetric outcomes among immigrants using the ‘three delays’ framework in a high-income context," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(11), pages 2028-2036.
    11. Kenneth Aarskaug Wiik & Jennifer A. Holland, 2015. "Partner choice and timing of first marriage among children of immigrants in Norway and Sweden," Discussion Papers 810, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    12. Anja Oppermann, 2012. "A New Color in the Picture: The Impact of Educational Fields on Fertility in Western Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 496, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    13. Nick Parr, 2011. "The contribution of increases in family benefits to Australia’s early 21st-century fertility increase: An empirical analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(6), pages 215-244, July.
    14. Patrizia Giannantoni & Giuseppe Gabrielli, 2015. "Fertility Of Immigrant Women In Italy:Outcomes From Unconventional Data," RIEDS - Rivista Italiana di Economia, Demografia e Statistica - Italian Review of Economics, Demography and Statistics, SIEDS Societa' Italiana di Economia Demografia e Statistica, vol. 69(2), pages 164-176, April-Jun.
    15. Teresa García-Mu-oz & Shoshana Neuman, 2013. "Immigration–religiosity intersections at the two sides of the Atlantic: Europe and the United States," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 18, pages 331-352 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    16. Hill Kulu & Tina Hannemann, 2016. "Why does fertility remain high among certain UK-born ethnic minority women?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(49), pages 1441-1488, December.
    17. Gunnar Andersson & Lotta Persson & Ognjen Obućina, 2017. "Depressed fertility among descendants of immigrants in Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(39), pages 1149-1184, April.
    18. Hill Kulu & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2014. "Family Dynamics Among Immigrants and Their Descendants in Europe: Current Research and Opportunities," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 411-435, November.
    19. Livia Elisa Ortensi, 2015. "Engendering the fertility-migration nexus: The role of women's migratory patterns in the analysis of fertility after migration," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(53), pages 1435-1468, June.
    20. Adserà , Alícia & Ferrer, Ana, 2013. "The Fertility of Recent Immigrant s to Canada," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2013-34, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 30 Jul 2013.
    21. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:19 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Stijn Baert & Frank W. Heiland & Sanders Korenman, 2016. "Native-Immigrant Gaps in Educational and School-to-Work Transitions in the 2nd Generation: The Role of Gender and Ethnicity," De Economist, Springer, vol. 164(2), pages 159-186, June.
    23. Eleonora Mussino & Salvatore Strozza, 2012. "The fertility of immigrants after arrival: The Italian case," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(4), pages 99-130, February.
    24. Alícia Adserà & Ana Ferrer, 2016. "The Fertility of Married Immigrant Women to Canada," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 475-505, June.
    25. repec:dem:demres:v:36:y:2017:i:45 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    childbearing; Europe; fertility; migration;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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