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Winners and Losers in the Global Economy


  • Kapstein, Ethan B.


During the 1980s, economists began to observe a trend of rising income inequality in the advanced industrial economies. At the same time, the data revealed that these economies were becoming increasingly exposed to imports of manufactured goods from developing countries. The question that follows is whether these outcomes are causally related, as economic theory suggests is possible.

Suggested Citation

  • Kapstein, Ethan B., 2000. "Winners and Losers in the Global Economy," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 54(02), pages 359-384, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:intorg:v:54:y:2000:i:02:p:359-384_44

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    Cited by:

    1. Robin Leichenko & Julie Silva, 2004. "International Trade, Employment and Earnings: Evidence from US Rural Counties," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 355-374.
    2. Ecker-Ehrhardt, Matthias, 2010. "Problem perception and public expectations in international institutions: Evidence from a German representative survey," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Global Governance SP IV 2010-302, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    3. Neumayer, Eric & Soysa, Indra de, 2006. "Globalization and the Right to Free Association and Collective Bargaining: An Empirical Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 31-49, January.
    4. Eric Neumayer & Indra de Soysa, 2004. "Globalization and the Right to Free Association and Collective," Labor and Demography 0410006, EconWPA, revised 22 Apr 2005.
    5. Robert Lepenies, 2014. "Economists as political philosophers : a critique of normative trade theory," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/11, European University Institute.
    6. Elia, Stefano & Maggi, Elena & Mariotti, Ilaria, 2009. "Does the logistics sector gain from manufacturing internationalisation? An empirical investigation on the Italian case," Economics & Statistics Discussion Papers esdp09052, University of Molise, Dept. EGSeI.
    7. Yakub Halabi, 2013. "Perpetuating the global division of labour: defensive free trade and development in the third world," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 20(1), pages 91-120, June.
    8. Bellefeuille, Gerard & McGrath, Jenny & Jamieson, Donna, 2008. "A pedagogical response to a changing world: Towards a globally-informed pedagogy for child and youth care education and practice," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 717-726, July.
    9. Kapitsinis, Nikolaos & Metaxas, Theodore, 2011. "Economic crisis and the role of state policies in current globalized economy. The case of Greece," MPRA Paper 43650, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Bellefeuille, Gerard, 2005. "The new politics of community-based governance requires a fundamental shift in the nature and character of the administrative bureaucracy," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 491-498, May.

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