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Extreme climate events and adaptation: an exploratory analysis of drought in Mexico

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  • BOYD, ROY
  • IBARRARÁN, MARIA E.

Abstract

Climate change is increasing the intensity of extreme weather events. Mexico is particularly prone to suffer at least two different types of these events: droughts and hurricanes. This paper focuses on the effects of an extended drought on the Mexican economy. Through a computable general equilibrium model, we simulate the impact of a drought that affects primarily agriculture, livestock, forestry, and hydropower generation. We look at the effects on the overall economy. We then simulate the effects of several adaptation strategies in (chiefly) the agricultural, forestry, and power sectors, and we arrive at some tentative yet significant conclusions. We find that the effects of such an event vary substantially by sector with moderate to severe overall impacts. Furthermore, we find that adaptation policies can only effect modest changes to the economic losses to be suffered.

Suggested Citation

  • Boyd, Roy & Ibarrarán, Maria E., 2009. "Extreme climate events and adaptation: an exploratory analysis of drought in Mexico," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(03), pages 371-395, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:14:y:2009:i:03:p:371-395_00
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    2. Strand, Jon & Walker, Ian, 2005. "Water markets and demand in Central American cities," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(03), pages 313-335, June.
    3. Kevin J. Boyle & P. Joan Poor & Laura O. Taylor, 1999. "Estimating the Demand for Protecting Freshwater Lakes from Eutrophication," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1118-1122.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wiebelt, Manfred & Breisinger, Clemens & Ecker, Olivier & Al-Riffai, Perrihan & Robertson, Richard & Thiele, Rainer, 2011. "Climate change and floods in Yemen: Impacts on food security and options for adaptation," IFPRI discussion papers 1139, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Wenjiao Shi & Fulu Tao, 2014. "Spatio-temporal distributions of climate disasters and the response of wheat yields in China from 1983 to 2008," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 74(2), pages 569-583, November.
    3. Pauw, Karl & Thurlow, James & van Seventer, Dirk, 2010. "Droughts and floods in Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 962, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Jing-Li Fan & Qiao-Mei Liang & Xiao-Jie Liang & Hirokazu Tatano & Yoshio Kajitani & Yi-Ming Wei, 2014. "National vulnerability to extreme climatic events: the cases of electricity disruption in China and Japan," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 71(3), pages 1937-1956, April.
    5. Breisinger, Clemens & Zhu, Tingju & Al Riffai, Perrihan & Nelson, Gerald & Robertson, Richard & Funes, Jose & Verner, Dorte, 2011. "Global and local economic impacts of climate change in Syria and options for adaptation:," IFPRI discussion papers 1091, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Freire-González, Jaume & Decker, Christopher & Hall, Jim W., 2017. "The Economic Impacts of Droughts: A Framework for Analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 196-204.
    7. Antón, Arturo & Boyd, Roy & Elizondo, Alejandra & Ibarrarán, María Eugenia, 2016. "Universal social insurance for Mexico: Modeling of a financing scheme," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 838-850.
    8. Cardenete, Manuel Alejandro & Delgado, M. Carmen, 2015. "A simulation of impact of withdrawal European funds on Andalusian economy using a dynamic CGE model: 2014–20," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 83-92.
    9. Ivana Logar & Jeroen Bergh, 2013. "Methods to Assess Costs of Drought Damages and Policies for Drought Mitigation and Adaptation: Review and Recommendations," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 27(6), pages 1707-1720, April.
    10. Elizondo, Alejandra & Boyd, Roy, 2017. "Economic impact of ethanol promotion in Mexico: A general equilibrium analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 293-301.

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