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Carbon emissions reduction strategies and poverty alleviation in India

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  • OJHA, VIJAY P.

Abstract

This paper, based on a computable general equilibrium model of the Indian economy, shows that a domestic carbon tax policy that recycles carbon tax revenues to households imposes heavy costs in terms of lower economic growth and higher poverty. However, the decline in economic growth and rise in poverty can be minimized if the emissions restriction target is modest, and carbon tax revenues are transferred exclusively to the poor. India's participation in an internationally tradable emission permits regime with grandfathered emissions allocation is preferable to any domestic carbon tax option, provided the world market price of emission permits remains low. Even better would be if India participated in a global system of tradable emission permits with equal per capita emission entitlements. India would then be able to use the revenues garnered from the sale of surplus permits to speed up its economic growth and poverty reduction and yet keep its per capita emissions below the 1990 per capita global emissions level.

Suggested Citation

  • Ojha, Vijay P., 2009. "Carbon emissions reduction strategies and poverty alleviation in India," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(03), pages 323-348, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:14:y:2009:i:03:p:323-348_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Wim Naudé, 2011. "Climate Change and Industrial Policy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(7), pages 1-19, July.
    2. Arief Yusuf & Budy Resosudarmo, 2015. "On the distributional impact of a carbon tax in developing countries: the case of Indonesia," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(1), pages 131-156, January.
    3. Ditya A Nurdianto & Budy P Resosudarmo, 2014. "ASEAN Economic community and climate change," Departmental Working Papers 2014-24, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    4. Wim Naudé, 2011. "Foreign Aid for Innovation: The Missing Ingredient in Private Sector Development?," Working Papers 2011/35, Maastricht School of Management.
    5. Mani, Muthukumara & Markandya, Anil & Sagar, Aarsi & Sahin, Sebnem, 2012. "India’s economic growth and environmental sustainability : what are the tradeoffs ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6208, The World Bank.
    6. Perrings, Charles, 2014. "Environment and development economics 20 years on," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(03), pages 333-366, June.
    7. Wang, Tao & Foliente, Greg & Song, Xinyi & Xue, Jiawei & Fang, Dongping, 2014. "Implications and future direction of greenhouse gas emission mitigation policies in the building sector of China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 520-530.

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