IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cje/issued/v41y2008i4p1262-1284.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Income effects and physician labour supply: evidence from the threshold system in Ontario

Author

Listed:
  • Jasmin Kantarevic
  • Boris Kralj
  • Darrel Weinkauf

Abstract

We examine a reform to the physician threshold system in Ontario that provides a unique opportunity to assess the effect of fee changes on physician behaviour, free from the biases that potentially affect simple time-series or cross-section inference. We find that: (1) the income effects of fee changes are small, but significant; (2) the income effect dominates the substitution effect only for a minority of services with relatively low prices and high volumes; and (3) the cross effects of fee changes tend to be significant only for services with relatively high prices and low volumes.

Suggested Citation

  • Jasmin Kantarevic & Boris Kralj & Darrel Weinkauf, 2008. "Income effects and physician labour supply: evidence from the threshold system in Ontario," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(4), pages 1262-1284, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:41:y:2008:i:4:p:1262-1284
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://economics.ca/cgi/xms?jab=v41n4/CJEv41n4p1262.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: Available to subscribers only. Alternative access through JSTOR and Ingenta.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kantarevic, Jasmin & Kralj, Boris & Weinkauf, Darrel, 2010. "Enhanced Fee-for-Service Model and Access to Physician Services: Evidence from Family Health Groups in Ontario," IZA Discussion Papers 4862, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Sung-Hee Jeon & Jeremiah Hurley, 2010. "Physician Resource Planning in Canada: The Need for a Stronger Behavioural Foundation," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-375, September.
    3. Brekke, Kurt R. & Holmås, Tor Helge & Monstad, Karin & Straume, Odd Rune, 2017. "Do treatment decisions depend on physicians' financial incentives?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 74-92.
    4. Katherine Cuff & Jeremiath Hurley & Stuart Mestelman & Andrew Muller & Robert Nuscheler, 2007. "Public and Private Health Care Financing with Alternate Public Rationing," Department of Economics Working Papers 2007-07, McMaster University.
    5. Sara Allin & Michael Baker & Maripier Isabelle & Mark Stabile, 2015. "Physician Incentives and the Rise in C-sections: Evidence from Canada," NBER Working Papers 21022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. repec:nip:nipewp:07/2015 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:41:y:2008:i:4:p:1262-1284. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Prof. Werner Antweiler). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ceaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.