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Too Big to Fail: A Misguided Policy in Times of Financial Turmoil

Author

Listed:
  • Clyde Goodlet

    (Bank of Canada (former))

Abstract

The bailouts carried out by governments for large banks and other financial entities in the recent financial turbulence are often characterized as a Too-Big-To-Fail (TBTF) policy. Proponents of such a policy argue that preventing the failure of large banks (and possibly other financial and non-financial entities) is necessary to limit the impact that such a failure might have on other institutions or on the real economy. Opponents argue that while such a policy might seem attractive in the short run, even given the enormous financial cost to government associated with its intervention, the long-run costs are even larger and are almost always ignored, making TBTF a poor policy choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Clyde Goodlet, 2010. "Too Big to Fail: A Misguided Policy in Times of Financial Turmoil," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 311, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdh:commen:311
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    File URL: https://www.cdhowe.org/public-policy-research/too-big-fail-misguided-policy-times-financial-turmoil
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel Boothby & Torben Drewes, 2010. "The Payoff: Returns to University, College and Trades Education in Canada, 1980 to 2005," e-briefs 104, C.D. Howe Institute.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Services; too-big-to-fail (TBTF);

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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