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Path-dependence in technological and institutional change -- some criticisms and suggestions

Author

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  • Kiwit Daniel

    (Max-Planck Institute for Research into Economic Systems, Jena)

Abstract

La littérature sur le sentier de corrélation met en doute lefficience du mécanisme de marché en ce qui concerne le choix des technologies et des normes caractérisé par les rendements croissants.Récemment cette idée a attiré lattention de quelques chercheurs spécialisés dans le processus de changement institutionnel. Dans cet article je soutiens quil y a de sérieux défauts dans la manière dont le sentier de corrélation des changements technologiques est habituellement présenté. Le point principal est quoi quil en soit le changement institutionnel. Ici, je montre que le concept de sentier de corrélation nécessite quelques modifications avant quil ne puisse être appliqué fructueusement.The literature of path-dependence casts doubt on the efficiency of the market mechanism concerning the choice of technologies and standards characterized by increasing returns. Recently this idea has aroused interest among scholars inquiring into the process of institutional change. In this article I argue that there are serious shortcomings in the way pathdependence of technological change is usually presented. The main focus is, however on institutional change. Here I show that the concept ot pathdependence needs some modification before it can fruitfully be applied.

Suggested Citation

  • Kiwit Daniel, 1996. "Path-dependence in technological and institutional change -- some criticisms and suggestions," Journal des Economistes et des Etudes Humaines, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-27, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:jeehcn:v:7:y:1996:i:1:n:4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. S. J. Liebowitz & Stephen E. Margolis, 1994. "Network Externality: An Uncommon Tragedy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 133-150, Spring.
    3. Klein, Benjamin & Crawford, Robert G & Alchian, Armen A, 1978. "Vertical Integration, Appropriable Rents, and the Competitive Contracting Process," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 297-326, October.
    4. Kirchgassner, Gebhard & Pommerehne, Werner W, 1993. "Low-Cost Decisions as a Challenge to Public Choice," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 77(1), pages 107-115, September.
    5. Denzau, Arthur T & North, Douglass C, 1994. "Shared Mental Models: Ideologies and Institutions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 3-31.
    6. Liebowitz, S J & Margolis, Stephen E, 1995. "Path Dependence, Lock-in, and History," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 205-226, April.
    7. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-337, May.
    8. Boyer, Robert & Orlean, Andre, 1992. "How Do Conventions Evolve?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 165-177, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gagliardi, Francesca, 2008. "Institutions and economic change: A critical survey of the new institutional approaches and empirical evidence," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 416-443, February.

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