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Labor Expenditures and Benefit-Cost Accounting in Times of Unemployment

Author

Listed:
  • Haveman Robert H.

    (University of Wisconsin - Madison)

  • Farrow Scott

    (UMBC)

Abstract

We summarize procedures for assessing the benefits and costs of using labor inputs in public projects. Examples are provided to illustrate how information on labor inputs can be analyzed and presented such that, should the analyst choose, labor services generate elements of both benefit and cost in times of high unemployment; however, this is not generally correct in times of full employment. Our analysis is consistent with the overall goal of identifying those projects which are estimated to improve efficiencythose with social benefits in excess of social costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Haveman Robert H. & Farrow Scott, 2011. "Labor Expenditures and Benefit-Cost Accounting in Times of Unemployment," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 1-9, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:jbcacn:v:2:y:2011:i:2:n:7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David H. Greenberg, 1997. "The Leisure Bias in Cost-Benefit Analyses of Employment and Training Programs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(2), pages 413-439.
    2. Kerry Krutilla, 2005. "Using the Kaldor-Hicks tableau format for cost-benefit analysis and policy evaluation," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 864-875.
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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy J. Bartik, 2014. "How Effects of Local Labor Demand Shocks Vary with Local Labor Market Conditions," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 14-202, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    2. Vitaliano, Donald F., 2012. "An Empirical Estimate of the Labor Response Function for Benefit-Cost Analysis," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, Cambridge University Press, pages 1-12.
    3. Adam Rose, 2015. "Macroeconomic consequences of terrorist attacks: estimation for the analysis of policies and rules," Chapters,in: Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies, chapter 8, pages 172-200 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Gillespie, Rob & Kragt, Marit E., 2012. "Accounting for Nonmarket Impacts in a Benefit-Cost Analysis of Underground Coal Mining in New South Wales, Australia," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, Cambridge University Press, pages 1-29.
    5. Laird, James J. & Mackie, Peter J., 2014. "Wider economic benefits of transport schemes in remote rural areas," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 92-102.
    6. Timothy J. Bartik, 2013. "Social Costs of Jobs Lost Due to Environmental Regulations," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 13-193, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

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