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Part-Time Work during Post-compulsory Education and Examination Performance: Help or Hindrance?

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  • McVicar, Duncan
  • McKee, Brian

Abstract

This paper examines the effects on examination performance of having a part-time job whilst in full-time post-sixteen education, using new data on young people in Northern Ireland. Around 35% engaged in part time employment during their education spell, compared to over 60% found by recent GB studies. This may be related to Northern Ireland's comparatively slack youth labour market and might reflect part-time employment levels in other peripheral regions. Our estimations suggest working part-time per se is not detrimental to examination performance, although working long hours is. Policy makers might improve educational performance by reducing incentives to work long hours. Copyright 2002 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • McVicar, Duncan & McKee, Brian, 2002. "Part-Time Work during Post-compulsory Education and Examination Performance: Help or Hindrance?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(4), pages 393-406, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:49:y:2002:i:4:p:393-406
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    Cited by:

    1. Maitra, Chandana & Rao, D.S. Prasada, 2015. "Poverty–Food Security Nexus: Evidence from a Survey of Urban Slum Dwellers in Kolkata," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 308-325.
    2. Christelle Laetitia Garrouste & Margarida Rodrigues, 2014. "Employability of young graduates in Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(4), pages 425-447, July.
    3. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9318-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Triventi, Moris, 2014. "Does working during higher education affect students’ academic progression?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-13.
    5. Rokicka, Magdalena, 2014. "The impact of students' part-time work on educational outcomes," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-42, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Does Student Work Really Affect Educational Outcomes? A Review of the Literature," GLO Discussion Paper Series 121, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    7. William H. Greene & David A. Hensher, 2008. "Modeling Ordered Choices: A Primer and Recent Developments," Working Papers 08-26, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    8. Mark Bailey, 2003. "The labour market participation of Northern Ireland University Students," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(11), pages 1345-1350.
    9. repec:qld:uq2004:508 is not listed on IDEAS

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