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The labour market participation of Northern Ireland University Students

Author

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  • Mark Bailey

    (University of Ulster)

Abstract

This paper seeks to examine what factors are associated with student labour force participation in Northern Ireland in both term-time and vacation making use of Quarterly Labour Force Survey data for the period March 1998 to February 1999. The results suggest female students are more likely to work than male students, mature students are less likely to work than non-mature students, Roman Catholic students are less likely to work than non-Roman Catholic students, students living at home are more likely to work than student living away from home and an increase in the actual or predicted wage increases the probability of labour force participation. The author suggests that some of these results are due to the particular nature of the Northern Ireland socio- economic situation while others are likely to be true for the rest of the United Kingdom.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Bailey, 2002. "The labour market participation of Northern Ireland University Students," Labor and Demography 0203004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0203004
    Note: Type of Document - Acrobat PDF; prepared on IBM PC; pages: 10 ; figures: included. 10 pages, PDF
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/lab/papers/0203/0203004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Duncan McVicar & Brian McKee, 2002. "Part–Time Work During Post–Compulsory Education And Examination Performance: Help Or Hindrance?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(4), pages 393-406, September.
    2. David Armstrong & Duncan McVicar, 2000. "Value added in further education and vocational training in Northern Ireland," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1727-1736.
    3. Layard, R & Barton, M & Zabalza, A, 1980. "Married Women's Participation and Hours," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(185), pages 51-72, February.
    4. Christian Dustmann & John Mickelwright & Najma Rajah & Stephen Smith, 1996. "Earning and learning: educational policy and the growth of part-time work by full-time pupils," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(1), pages 79-103, February.
    5. Mark Bailey & Tony Mallier, 1999. "The summer vacation: influences on the hours students work," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 9-15.
    6. John Micklewright & Najma Rajah & Stephen Smith, 1994. "Labouring and Learning: Part-Time Work and Full-Time Education," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 148(1), pages 73-97, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Don Webber & Andrew Mearman, 2009. "Student participation in sporting activities," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(9), pages 1183-1190.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education employment Northern Ireland;

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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