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On the Aggregate Housing Market Implications of Labour Market Change


  • Meen, Geoffrey
  • Andrew, Mark


Labor markets in the United Kingdom have undergone important structural changes in recent years. Given the close relationship between labor and housing markets, these changes are likely to have had knock-on effects to housing. This paper examines the quantitative evidence in this area in terms of aggregate housing demand and house prices, set in a life-cycle framework. The paper finds evidence of structural change in the 1990s in the traditional relationships used to predict house price movements which can, at least partly, be attributed to changes in the labor market. Copyright 1998 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Meen, Geoffrey & Andrew, Mark, 1998. "On the Aggregate Housing Market Implications of Labour Market Change," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 45(4), pages 393-419, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:45:y:1998:i:4:p:393-419

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Wolfgang Scheremet, 1995. "Tarifpolitik in Ostdeutschland: Ausstieg aus dem Lohnverhandlungsmodell der Bundesrepublik Deutschland?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 113, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Lars Calmfors, 1993. "Centralisation of Wage Bargaining and Macroeconomic Performance: A Survey," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 131, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Steven Clark & T. Coggin, 2009. "Trends, Cycles and Convergence in U.S. Regional House Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 264-283, October.
    2. International Monetary Fund, 2005. "United Kingdom; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 05/81, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Meen, Geoffrey, 2002. "The Time-Series Behavior of House Prices: A Transatlantic Divide?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 1-23, March.
    4. Veronica John Muellbauer & Veronica David M Williams, 2012. "Credit conditions and the real economy: the elephant in the room," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Property markets and financial stability, volume 64, pages 95-101 Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Arno J van der Vlist & Cees Gorter & Peter Nijkamp & Piet Rietveld, 2002. "Residential Mobility and Local Housing-Market Differences," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 34(7), pages 1147-1164, July.
    6. Geoffrey Meen & Alexander Mihailov & Yehui Wang, 2016. "Endogenous UK Housing Cycles and the Risk Premium: Understanding the Next Housing Crisis," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2016-02, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    7. Anundsen, André K. & Jansen, Eilev S., 2013. "Self-reinforcing effects between housing prices and credit," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 192-212.
    8. Cho, Seong-Hoon & English, Burton C. & Roberts, Roland K., 2005. "A Spatial Analysis of Housing Growth," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 35(3), pages 311-335.
    9. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Clark, Christopher D. & Park, William M., 2005. "Projecting Spatial Pattern of Housing Growth in Tennessee," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19392, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Clark, Christopher D. & Park, William M., 2006. "Two Dimensions of the Spatial Distribution of Housing: Dependency and Heterogeneity across Tennessee’s Six Metropolitan Statistical Areas," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 38(02), August.
    11. Jinke Li & Geoffrey Meen, 2016. "Agent Based Models, Housing Fluctuations and the Role of Heterogeneous Expectations," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2016-09, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    12. John Muellbauer & Pierre St-Amant & David Williams, 2015. "Credit Conditions and Consumption, House Prices and Debt: What Makes Canada Different?," Staff Working Papers 15-40, Bank of Canada.
    13. Frank Denton & Dean Mountain, 2014. "The implications of mean scaling for the calculation of aggregate consumer elasticities," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(3), pages 297-314, September.
    14. André K. Anundsen & Eilev S. Jansen, 2013. "Self-reinforcing effects between housing prices and credit: an extended version," Discussion Papers 756, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

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