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Growth Management and Land use Controls: The San Francisco Bay Area Experience

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  • Kenneth T. Rosen
  • Lawrence F. Katz

Abstract

Local land use and growth controls have had a substantial negative impact on the San Francisco Bay Area housing market. These regulations have significantly diminished the availability of development opportunities in the region and forced builders to make major changes in the way they do business and costly alterations in their development projects. Both the empirical evidence reviewed and the case studies documented in this paper indicate that building moratoria, growth management systems, and restrictive zoning practices have helped lead to significantly increased house prices in those Bay Area communities in which they are present. The evidence strongly suggests that land use controls as they are currently utilized in the Bay Area provide a poor policy alternative for reconciling important environmental and fiscal considerations with equally important regional and national housing needs. Copyright American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth T. Rosen & Lawrence F. Katz, 1981. "Growth Management and Land use Controls: The San Francisco Bay Area Experience," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 9(4), pages 321-344.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:9:y:1981:i:4:p:321-344
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Katharine R E Sims & Jenny Schuetz, 2007. "Environmental Regulation and Land Use Change: Do Local Wetlands Bylaws Slow the Conversion of Open Space to Residential Uses?," CID Working Papers 18, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Turner, Matthew A., 2005. "Landscape preferences and patterns of residential development," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 19-54, January.
    3. Giuliano, Genevieve, 1991. "Is Jobs-Housing Balance a Transportation Issue?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4874r4hg, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Brueckner, Jan K. & Lai, Fu-Chuan, 1996. "Urban growth controls with resident landowners," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 125-143, April.
    5. Adji Fatou Diagne & Haydar Kurban & BenoƮt Schmutz, 2017. "Are Inclusionary Housing Programs Color-blind? The Case of Montgomery County MPDU Program," Working Papers 2017-47, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    6. Waldorf, Brigitte S. & Byun, Pillsung & Florax, Raymond J.G.M., 2005. "Strategic Interaction and Spatial Multiplier Effects in Local Growth Control Policies: The California Housing Market," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19574, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Jyh-Bang Jou & Tan (Charlene) Lee, 2009. "How Does a Development Moratorium Affect Development Timing Choices and Land Values?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 301-315, October.
    8. Katz, Lawrence & Rosen, Kenneth T, 1987. "The Interjurisdictional Effects of Growth Controls on Housing Prices," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 149-160, April.
    9. Genevieve Giuliano, 2000. "Land Use Policy and Transportation: Why We Won't Get There from Here," Working Paper 8649, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    10. Jou, Jyh-Bang, 2012. "Efficient growth boundaries in the presence of population externalities and stochastic rents," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 349-357.
    11. Brueckner, Jan K., 1995. "Strategic control of growth in a system of cities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 393-416, July.
    12. Sims, Katharine R.E. & Schuetz, Jenny, 2009. "Local regulation and land-use change: The effects of wetlands bylaws in Massachusetts," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 409-421, July.

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