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Where Do Cities Form? A Geographical Agglomeration Model for Europe

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  • Dirk Stelder

Abstract

In the recent literature on spatial agglomeration models, substantial progress has been made in modeling urban structures in terms of number and size of cities, but the question where cities arise remains unanswered. This paper illustrates that if a spatial agglomeration model is extended with a true geographical dimension, the location of cities can also be endogenized. A geographical agglomeration model for Europe shows that the size and place of cities can be simultaneously determined. The empirical results suggest that elementary economic forces such as agglomeration economies and transportation costs might be able to explain place and size of cities in the long run to a substantial degree. In addition, some new statistical measures of fit are discussed that are needed to evaluate simulations results of this kind. Copyright Blackwell Publishers, 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Dirk Stelder, 2005. "Where Do Cities Form? A Geographical Agglomeration Model for Europe," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 657-679.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:45:y:2005:i:4:p:657-679
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    Cited by:

    1. Kumagai, Satoru & Hayakawa, Kazunobu & Isono, Ikumo & Keola, Souknilanh & Tsubota, Kenmei, 2013. "Geographical simulation analysis for logistics enhancement in Asia," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 145-153.
    2. Maria Florencia Granato, 2011. "REGIONAL NEW ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY (refereed paper)," ERSA conference papers ersa10p747, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & Kamar Ali & M. Rose Olfert, 2009. "Do New Economic Geography agglomeration shadows underlie current population dynamics across the urban hierarchy?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(2), pages 445-466, June.
    4. Bode, Eckhardt & Mutl, Jan, 2010. "Testing Nonlinear New Economic Geography Models," Economics Series 253, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    5. Ikeda, Kiyohiro & Murota, Kazuo & Akamatsu, Takashi & Kono, Tatsuhito & Takayama, Yuki, 2014. "Self-organization of hexagonal agglomeration patterns in new economic geography models," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 32-52.
    6. Behrens, Kristian, 2007. "On the location and lock-in of cities: Geography vs transportation technology," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 22-45, January.
    7. Arne Melchior, 2009. "East-West Integration and the Economic Geography of Europe," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0379, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:654-:d:134065 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Robert Cromley & Dean Hanink, 2008. "Population growth and the development of a central place system," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 383-405, December.
    10. Ryusuke Ihara, 2011. "Weber problem in the NEG: a case study of Asia," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 47(1), pages 37-50, August.
    11. Kristian Behrens & Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 2009. "Krugman's "Papers in Regional Science": The 100 dollar bill on the sidewalk is gone and the 2008 Nobel Prize well-deserved," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(2), pages 467-489, June.
    12. repec:eee:dyncon:v:92:y:2018:i:c:p:129-152 is not listed on IDEAS

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