IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

International Evidence on Weekend Anomalies


  • Tong, Wilson


Recent studies on the U.S. market find that the Monday effect is observed mainly when the return on the previous Friday is negative or when the Monday falls within the last two weeks of the month. I look for international evidence and examine whether such properties of the Monday effect are related to another anomalous phenomenon-high weekend correlation. By examining twenty-three equity market indexes, I find that the negative Friday is, in general, important to the Monday effect. Furthermore, Monday returns tend to be lowest on the fourth week of the month. Although high weekend correlation is also common to these markets, it seems not related to the bad-Friday factor and shows no seasonality across weeks of the month.

Suggested Citation

  • Tong, Wilson, 2000. "International Evidence on Weekend Anomalies," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 23(4), pages 495-522, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jfnres:v:23:y:2000:i:4:p:495-522

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Pennacchi, George G, 1988. " Loan Sales and the Cost of Bank Capital," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(2), pages 375-396, June.
    2. Jith Jayaratne & Philip E. Strahan, 1996. "The Finance-Growth Nexus: Evidence from Bank Branch Deregulation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(3), pages 639-670.
    3. Carlstrom, Charles T. & Samolyk, Katherine A., 1995. "Loan sales as a response to market-based capital constraints," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3-4), pages 627-646, June.
    4. Jayaratne, Jith & Strahan, Philip E, 1998. "Entry Restrictions, Industry Evolution, and Dynamic Efficiency: Evidence from Commercial Banking," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 239-273, April.
    5. Haubrich, Joseph G & Thomson, James B, 1996. "Loan Sales, Implicit Contracts, and Bank Structure," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 137-162, September.
    6. Gorton, Gary B. & Pennacchi, George G., 1995. "Banks and loan sales Marketing nonmarketable assets," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 389-411, June.
    7. Rebecca Demsetz, 1993. "Recent trends in commercial bank loan sales," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Win, pages 75-78.
    8. Demsetz, Rebecca S & Strahan, Philip E, 1997. "Diversification, Size, and Risk at Bank Holding Companies," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(3), pages 300-313, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Mehmet Dicle & John Levendis, 2014. "The day-of-the-week effect revisited: international evidence," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 38(3), pages 407-437, July.
    2. Julijana Angelovska, 2013. "An Econometric Analysis of Market Anomaly - Day of the Week Effect on a Small Emerging Market," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 3(1), pages 314-322, January.
    3. Hüseyin Kaya & Sadullah Çelik, 2009. "Empirical Evidence For Day Of The Week Effect In An Emerging Market: The Turkish Case," 2009 Meeting Papers 219, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Stephen P. Keef & Hui Zhu, 2009. "The Monday effect in U.S. cotton prices," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 427-448.
    5. Rayenda Brahmana & Chee-Wooi Hooy & Zamri Ahmad, 2012. "Weather, investor irrationality and day-of-the-week anomaly: case of Indonesia," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 129-146, July.
    6. Farag, Hisham, 2013. "Price limit bands, asymmetric volatility and stock market anomalies: Evidence from emerging markets," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 85-97.
    7. Keef, Stephen P. & Khaled, Mohammed S., 2011. "A review of the seasonal affective disorder hypothesis," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 959-967.
    8. Bley, Jorg & Saad, Mohsen, 2010. "Cross-cultural differences in seasonality," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 306-312, September.
    9. Imtiaz Mazumder, M. & Chu, Ting-Heng & Miller, Edward M. & Prather, Larry J., 2008. "International day-of-the-week effects: An empirical examination of iShares," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 699-715, September.
    10. Keef, Stephen P. & Khaled, Mohammed & Zhu, Hui, 2009. "The dynamics of the Monday effect in international stock indices," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 125-133, June.
    11. Rayenda Khresna Brahmana & Chee-Wooi Hooy & Zamri Ahmad, 2012. "Psychological factors on irrational financial decision making: Case of day-of-the week anomaly," Humanomics: The International Journal of Systems and Ethics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 236-257, October.
    12. Keef, Stephen P. & Khaled, Mohammed S., 2011. "Are investors moonstruck? Further international evidence on lunar phases and stock returns," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 56-63, January.
    13. Kedar-Levy, Haim & Yu, Xiaoyan & Kamesaka, Akiko & Ben-Zion, Uri, 2010. "The impact of daily return limit and segmented clientele on stock returns in China," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 223-236, September.
    14. Lean, Hooi Hooi & Smyth, Russell & Wong, Wing-Keung, 2007. "Revisiting calendar anomalies in Asian stock markets using a stochastic dominance approach," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 125-141, April.
    15. Anthony Gu, 2004. "The Reversing Weekend Effect: Evidence from the U.S. Equity Markets," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 5-14, January.
    16. Miyano, Takaya & Tatsumi, Kenichi, 2012. "Determining anomalous dynamic patterns in price indexes of the London Metal Exchange by data synchronization," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(22), pages 5500-5511.
    17. 1Shieldvie Halim Author_Email: & Aldrin Herwany, & Rayenda Brahmana, 2011. "The Seasonality Of Market Integration: Case Of Indonesian Stock Markets," 2nd International Conference on Business and Economic Research (2nd ICBER 2011) Proceeding 2011-439, Conference Master Resources.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jfnres:v:23:y:2000:i:4:p:495-522. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.