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Political components of the industrial revolution: Parliament and the English cotton textile industry, 1660-1774

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  • PATRICK O'BRIEN
  • TREVOR GRIFFITHS
  • PHILIP HUNT

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Suggested Citation

  • Patrick O'Brien & Trevor Griffiths & Philip Hunt, 1991. "Political components of the industrial revolution: Parliament and the English cotton textile industry, 1660-1774," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 44(3), pages 395-423, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:44:y:1991:i:3:p:395-423
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0289.1991.tb01271.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mokyr, Joel, 1976. "Industrial Growth and Stagnation in the Low Countries, 1800–1850," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(01), pages 276-278, March.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Calico Acts: Was British cotton made possible by infant industry protection from Indian competition?
      by pseudoerasmus in Pseudoerasmus on 2017-01-05 11:01:14

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    Cited by:

    1. Dan Bogart, 2016. "The East Indian Monopoly and the Transition from Limited Access in England, 1600–1813," NBER Chapters,in: Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development, pages 23-49 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Broadberry Stephen, 2012. "Recent Developments in the Theory of Very Long Run Growth: A Historical Appraisal," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 53(1), pages 277-306, May.
    3. Dan Bogart, 2008. "Competition and Commitment: the Supply and Enforcement of Rights to Improve Roads and Rivers in England, 1600-1750," Working Papers 070817, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    4. Parker, Lee D., 2014. "Corporate social accountability through action: Contemporary insights from British industrial pioneers," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 632-659.
    5. Broadberry, Stephen N & Gupta, Bishnupriya, 2005. "Cotton Textiles and the Great Divergence: Lancashire, India and Shifting Competitive Advantage, 1600-1850," CEPR Discussion Papers 5183, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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