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Modelling the Probability of Youth Unemployment in Australia

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  • Harris, Mark N

Abstract

This paper attempts to explain how particular personal characteristics affect the probability of Australian youth unemployment. Results indicate that generally age, education, and financial commitments exert a positive influence on employment prospects. Also, there is evidence to suggest that the disabled are disadvantaged in the workplace and that women are less likely to supply their labor if they have children. The results are compared to the known effects of personal characteristics on the duration of unemployment, pointing policy clearly in the direction of age, education, and reservation wages. Copyright 1996 by The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Harris, Mark N, 1996. "Modelling the Probability of Youth Unemployment in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 72(217), pages 118-129, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:72:y:1996:i:217:p:118-29
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    Cited by:

    1. Kelly, Elish & McGuinness, Seamus, 2015. "Impact of the Great Recession on unemployed and NEET individuals’ labour market transitions in Ireland," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 59-71.
    2. Matthew Gray & Lixia Qu, 2003. "Determinants of Australian Mothers’ Employment: An Analysis of Lone and Couple Mothers," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 6(4), pages 597-617, December.
    3. Le, Anh T & Miller, Paul W, 2000. "Australia's Unemployment Problem," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(232), pages 74-104, March.
    4. Bruce Chapman & Matthew Gray, 2002. "Youth Unemployment: Aggregate Incidence and Consequences for Individuals," CEPR Discussion Papers 459, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    5. Baffoe-Bonnie, John & Ezeala-Harrison, Fidelis, 2005. "Incidence and duration of unemployment spells: Implications for the male-female wage differentials," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-5), pages 824-847, September.
    6. Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Polidano, Cain, 2011. "Improving the Employment Rates of People with Disabilities through Vocational Education," IZA Discussion Papers 5548, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Jeff Borland, 2000. "Disaggregated Models of Unemployment in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2000n16, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Mavromaras, Kostas & Polidano, Cain, 2011. "NILS Working paper no 165. Improving the employment rates of people with disabilities through vocational education," NILS Working Papers 26068, National Institute of Labour Studies.
    9. Kelly, Elish & McGuinness, Seamus & O'Connell, Philip J., 2011. "Transitions to Long-Term Unemployment Risk Among Young People: Evidence from Ireland," Papers WP394, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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