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Changes in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the United States, 1980-2000

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  • John Schmitt
  • Jonathan Wadsworth

Abstract

We compare the relative labour market performance of immigrants in the USA and in Britain over the period 1980-2000, when the stocks of immigrants were rising in both countries alongside differential shifts in demand and changes to labour market institutions. We find that the average relative employment prospects of immigrants are generally better in the USA than in Britain, particularly for non-white immigrants, while the average relative wage prospects for immigrants are generally better in Britain, particularly for men. Over time, relative wage and employment prospects for immigrants to the USA appear to have deteriorated, particularly among women, in a way that is not as apparent in Britain. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • John Schmitt & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2007. "Changes in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the United States, 1980-2000," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 659-686, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:45:y:2007:i:4:p:659-686
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Clark, Ken & Lindley, Joanne, 2006. "Immigrant Labour Market Assimilation and Arrival Effects: Evidence from the UK Labour Force Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 2228, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Rienzo, Cinzia, 2008. "Residual Wage Inequality and Immigration in the UK and the US," MPRA Paper 30279, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2011.
    2. Jonathan Wadsworth, 2013. "Mustn't Grumble: Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(1), pages 55-82, March.
    3. Adriano Paggiaro, 2013. "How do immigrants fare during the downturn? Evidence from matching comparable natives," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(8), pages 229-258, February.
    4. Jonathan Wadsworth, 2012. "Musn’t Grumble. Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1221, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    5. Elisabet Motellón & Enrique López-Bazo, 2015. "Job Loss Among Immigrant and Native Workers: Evidence from Spain’s Economic Downturn," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(2), pages 345-371, January.
    6. Marco Manacorda & Alan Manning & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2012. "The Impact Of Immigration On The Structure Of Wages: Theory And Evidence From Britain," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 120-151, February.
    7. Cinzia Rienzo, 2014. "Residual Wage Inequality and Immigration in the USA and the UK," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(3), pages 288-308, September.

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