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Changes in Poverty Rates during the Howard Era

Author

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  • Joan R. Rodgers
  • Peter Siminski
  • James Bishop

Abstract

"This article considers changes in poverty rates under the Howard government. We also make three methodological contributions. We consider the statistical significance of the estimated changes in poverty. We propose a decomposition technique that reconciles the trends in absolute and relative poverty. We also use 'poverty profiles', which illustrate sensitivity to alternative poverty lines. We find decreases in absolute poverty and increases in relative poverty, both of which are statistically significant over a range of poverty lines. At a poverty line equal to half of the median income, the increase in relative poverty is statistically significant for all people and borders on significance for children." Copyright (c)2009 The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.

Suggested Citation

  • Joan R. Rodgers & Peter Siminski & James Bishop, 2009. "Changes in Poverty Rates during the Howard Era," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(3), pages 300-320.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:42:y:2009:i:3:p:300-320
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter Saunders & Bruce Bradbury, 2006. "Monitoring Trends in Poverty and Income Distribution: Data, Methodology and Measurement," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(258), pages 341-364, September.
    2. Peter Siminski & Peter Saunders & Bruce Bradbury, 2003. "Reviewing the Intertemporal Consistency of ABS Household Income Data through Comparisons with External Aggregates," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 36(3), pages 333-349.
    3. Rebecca M. Blank, 2008. "Presidential address: How to improve poverty measurement in the United States," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 233-254.
    4. Roger Wilkins, 2007. "The Changing Socio-Demographic Composition of Poverty in Australia: 1982 to 2004," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n12, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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