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Deterrence and Incapacitation Effects in a Closed Area: A Case Study of Auto Theft in Taiwan


  • Hung-Lin Tao
  • Ling-Chih Kuo


Deterrence and incapacitation effects of auto theft are estimated with a full consideration of substitution effects across crime types and across districts in a closed area in which none of the effects will leak out. It is found that the increase in the cleared rate of auto theft crime in a certain district and in other districts strongly deters the auto theft in that district, indicating that the across-district deterrence effect dominates the across-district substitution effect. The across-crime deterrence effect significantly exceeds the across-crime substitution effect for close crime (general theft), but is insignificant for distant crime (violence). Copyright 2010 The Authors. Asian Economic Journal 2010 East Asian Economic Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Hung-Lin Tao & Ling-Chih Kuo, 2010. "Deterrence and Incapacitation Effects in a Closed Area: A Case Study of Auto Theft in Taiwan," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 203-220, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:24:y:2010:i:3:p:203-220

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    References listed on IDEAS

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