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Does anybody like water restrictions? Some observations in Australian urban communities

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  • Bethany Cooper
  • John Rose
  • Lin Crase

Abstract

Mandatory water restrictions continue to be the immediate response to urban water shortages in most major cities in southern Australia. Whilst generally rejected by economists on efficiency grounds, restrictions and the enforcement regimes used to invoke them are, nonetheless, viewed by some in the community as a positive way of dealing with water scarcity. Given the likelihood that urban water restrictions will persist for some time, there is value in understanding householders’ attitudes in this context. The impact and acceptability of differing approaches to enforcement is of particular interest, because this has wider ramifications for the administration of policy generally. This paper uses the results from a choice experiment to investigate the interplay between different components of a water restriction regime. In stark contrast to prevailing views that focus on the community benefits from ‘sharing the pain of water shortages’, results point to the significance of being able to inform on ones neighbours as a component of the enforcement regimes.
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Suggested Citation

  • Bethany Cooper & John Rose & Lin Crase, 2012. "Does anybody like water restrictions? Some observations in Australian urban communities," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 56(1), pages 61-81, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ajarec:v:56:y:2012:i:1:p:61-81
    DOI: j.1467-8489.2011.00573.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8489.2011.00573.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Gill, David A. & Schuhmann, Peter W. & Oxenford, Hazel A., 2015. "Recreational diver preferences for reef fish attributes: Economic implications of future change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 48-57.
    2. Nicholas Pawsey & Lin Crase, 2013. "The Mystique of Water Pricing and Accounting," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(3), pages 328-339, September.
    3. repec:eee:ecolec:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:95-105 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. John Freebairn, 2013. "Imperfect Knowledge and Urban Water Decisions," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(1), pages 32-40, March.
    5. Freebairn, John W., 2012. "Risk Aversion and Urban Water Decisions," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124206, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    6. Cooper, Bethany & Crase, Lin, 2016. "Governing water service provision: Lessons from Australia," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(PA), pages 42-47.

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