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Property rights, production technology, and deforestation: cocoa in Cameroon

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  • Harounan Kazianga
  • William A. Masters

Abstract

In this article, we use a vintage-capital model with risk of eviction to assess cocoa farmers' response to changes in their tenure security and to the introduction of a new, faster-maturing cocoa variety. The model is calibrated with data from Cameroon in calendar year 2000, and then used to simulate the effects of institutional and technical change on farmer welfare and deforestation rates. Our findings can be summarized in three points. First, improved tenure security over cocoa fields increases farmers' consumption and welfare, but at the expense of more deforestation. Second, the introduction of new cocoa varieties with faster maturity and higher input response also unambiguously raises farmers' consumption and welfare. Doing so increases deforestation under insecure land tenure, but slows down deforestation under secure land tenure. Third, when introducing the two innovations together (more security and also new varieties), there is both an increase in welfare and a decline in deforestation. In sum, the availability of new cocoa cultivars calls for stronger tenure security, to accommodate investment in the new technology without increasing deforestation. Copyright 2006 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Harounan Kazianga & William A. Masters, 2006. "Property rights, production technology, and deforestation: cocoa in Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(1), pages 19-26, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:35:y:2006:i:1:p:19-26
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nikolaj Malchow-Moeller & Bo Jellesmark Thorsen, "undated". "A Dynamic Agricultural Household Model with Uncertain Income and Irreversible and Indivisible Investments under Credit Constraints," Economics Working Papers 2000-7, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kazianga, Harounan & Masters, William A. & McMillan, Margaret S., 2014. "Disease control, demographic change and institutional development in Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 313-326.
    2. Bamou, Ernest & Masters, William A., 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Cameroon," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48518, World Bank.
    3. Salahodjaev, Raufhon, 2016. "Intelligence and deforestation: International data," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 20-27.
    4. Deininger, Klaus, 2010. "Towards sustainable systems of land administration: Recent evidence and challenges for Africa," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 5(1), September.
    5. Margaret S. McMillan & William A. Masters & Harounan Kazianga, 2011. "Rural Demography, Public Services and Land Rights in Africa: A Village-Level Analysis in Burkina Faso," NBER Working Papers 17718, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Resosudarmo, Ida Aju Pradnja & Atmadja, Stibniati & Ekaputri, Andini Desita & Intarini, Dian Y. & Indriatmoko, Yayan & Astri, Pangestuti, 2014. "Does Tenure Security Lead to REDD+ Project Effectiveness? Reflections from Five Emerging Sites in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 68-83.

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