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Transforming accounting curricula to enhance integrative learning

Author

Listed:
  • Bonnie Amelia Dean
  • Stephanie Perkiss
  • Milica Simic Misic
  • Karina Luzia

Abstract

Higher education is fundamental to the accounting profession. However, increased competition, the need to shape responsible global citizens and global influences impacting the profession have highlighted weaknesses in existing accounting curricula with regard to non‐technical skills, professional values and ethics. This paper reports on an approach to improve student learning in a first‐year undergraduate accounting subject through scholarship of teaching and learning and critical participatory action research. The paper highlights the importance of embedding opportunities for integrative learning in accounting curricula to enable students’ developing professional competencies and lifelong learning. It also provides a model for accounting educators to enhance integrative capabilities in their courses through engagement with scholarly research on teaching.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonnie Amelia Dean & Stephanie Perkiss & Milica Simic Misic & Karina Luzia, 2020. "Transforming accounting curricula to enhance integrative learning," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 60(3), pages 2301-2338, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:acctfi:v:60:y:2020:i:3:p:2301-2338
    DOI: 10.1111/acfi.12363
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/acfi.12363
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Dann Fisher & Diane Swanson & Jaime Schmidt, 2007. "Accounting Education Lags CPE Ethics Requirements: Implications for the Profession and a Call to Action," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 345-363.
    3. Paul De Lange & Beverley Jackling & Anne‐Marie Gut, 2006. "Accounting graduates’ perceptions of skills emphasis in undergraduate courses: an investigation from two Victorian universities," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 46(3), pages 365-386, September.
    4. Alan Sangster, 2015. "You Cannot Judge a Book by Its Cover: The Problems with Journal Rankings," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(3), pages 175-186, June.
    5. Stanley, Trevor & Marsden, Stephen, 2013. "Accountancy capstone: Enhancing integration and professional identity," Journal of Accounting Education, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 363-382.
    6. Avika Mungal & Melanie Cloete, 2016. "Preparing underprepared students for higher education and beyond: the development and implementation of an integrated project," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 203-222, June.
    7. Barry Cooper & Philomena Leung & Steven Dellaportas & Beverley Jackling & Grace Wong, 2008. "Ethics Education for Accounting Students—a Toolkit Approach," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 405-430.
    8. Marie H. Kavanagh & Lyndal Drennan, 2008. "What skills and attributes does an accounting graduate need? Evidence from student perceptions and employer expectations," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 48(2), pages 279-300, June.
    9. Apostolou, Barbara & Dorminey, Jack W. & Hassell, John M. & Rebele, James E., 2015. "Accounting education literature review (2013–2014)," Journal of Accounting Education, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 69-127.
    10. Samantha Sin & Nicholas McGuigan, 2013. "Fit for Purpose: A Framework for Developing and Assessing Complex Graduate Attributes in a Changing Higher Education Environment," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(6), pages 522-543, December.
    11. Nicholas McGuigan, 2015. "The Impact of Journal Rankings on Australasian Accounting Education Scholarship - A Personal View," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(3), pages 187-207, June.
    12. Beverley Jackling & Paul De Lange, 2009. "Do Accounting Graduates' Skills Meet The Expectations of Employers? A Matter of Convergence or Divergence," Accounting Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4-5), pages 369-385.
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