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Pasture-Based Dairy Systems: Who Are the Producers and Are Their Operations More Profitable than Conventional Dairies?

Author

Listed:
  • Gillespie, Jeffrey M.
  • Nehring, Richard F.
  • Hallahan, Charles B.
  • Sandretto, Carmen L.

Abstract

U.S. dairy operations are sorted via a multinomial logit model into three production systems: pasture-based, semi-pasture-based, and conventional. Region, farm size, financial situation, and production intensity measures impact system choice. Analysis follows to determine the impact of production system on enterprise profitability. Region, farm size, and demographic variables impact profitability, as does system choice: semi-pasture-based operations were less profitable than conventional operations on an enterprise, per hundredweight of milk produced basis. Significant differences were not found in the profitability of pasture-based operations versus those using other systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Gillespie, Jeffrey M. & Nehring, Richard F. & Hallahan, Charles B. & Sandretto, Carmen L., 2009. "Pasture-Based Dairy Systems: Who Are the Producers and Are Their Operations More Profitable than Conventional Dairies?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(3), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:57630
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nehring, Richard & Sauer, Johannes & Gillespie, Jeffrey & Hallahan, Charlie, 2016. "United States and European Union Dairy Farms: Where Is the Competitive Edge?," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 19(B).
    2. Nehring, Richard & Gillespie, Jeffrey & Katchova, Ani L. & Hallahan, Charlie & Harris, J. Michael & Erickson, Ken, 2015. "What’s Driving U.S. Broiler Farm Profitability?," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 18(A).
    3. Gillespie, Jeffrey & Nyaupane, Narayan & McMillin, Kenneth & Harrison, Wes, 2014. "The Impact of Marketing Channels Used by U.S. Meat Goat Producers on Farm Profitability," 2014 Annual Meeting, February 1-4, 2014, Dallas, Texas 162499, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. Wolf, Christopher A. & Tonsor, Glynn T. & Olynk, Nicole J., 2011. "Understanding U.S. Consumer Demand for Milk Production Attributes," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 36(2), August.
    5. Aimee N. Hafla & Jennifer W. MacAdam & Kathy J. Soder, 2013. "Sustainability of US Organic Beef and Dairy Production Systems: Soil, Plant and Cattle Interactions," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(7), pages 1-26, July.
    6. Qushim, Berdikul & Gillespie, Jeffrey, 2016. "Women Farm Operators in the U.S. Meat Goat Production: Who is More Productive?," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230004, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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