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On the Cost of Lost Production from Russian Oil Fields


  • James L. Smith


Russia is now paying heavily for past mismanagement of its major oh, fields. Unconventional attempts to maximize short-run extraction, neglect of routine maintenance, and shortages of critical equipment have combined to cause a steep decline in production. This study examines the scope and size of resulting economic losses using an extension of the traditional exponential decline model. Estimates derived from the model indicate that as much as 40% of the potential value of Russian oil reserves has been lost through poor management.

Suggested Citation

  • James L. Smith, 1995. "On the Cost of Lost Production from Russian Oil Fields," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 25-58.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1995v16-02-a02

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fama, Eugene F & French, Kenneth R, 1988. " Business Cycles and the Behavior of Metals Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(5), pages 1075-1093, December.
    2. Lester G. Telser, 1958. "Futures Trading and the Storage of Cotton and Wheat," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 233-233.
    3. French, Kenneth R, 1986. "Detecting Spot Price Forecasts in Futures Prices," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(2), pages 39-54, April.
    4. Fama, Eugene F., 1984. "Forward and spot exchange rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 319-338, November.
    5. Serletis, Apostolos, 1991. "Rational expectations, risk and efficiency in energy futures markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 111-115, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. James L. Smith, 2012. "Modeling the Impact of Taxes on Petroleum Exploration and Development," IMF Working Papers 12/278, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Smith, James L., 2013. "Issues in extractive resource taxation: A review of research methods and models," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 320-331.
    3. Okullo, Samuel J. & Reynès, Frédéric & Hofkes, Marjan W., 2015. "Modeling peak oil and the geological constraints on oil production," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 36-56.
    4. Smith, James L., 2014. "A parsimonious model of tax avoidance and distortions in petroleum exploration and development," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 140-157.
    5. Stevens, Paul, 1997. "Increasing global dependence on Gulf oil: `This year, next year, sometime, never?'," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 135-142, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General


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