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Do Economists Swing for the Fences after Tenure?

Author

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  • Jonathan Brogaard
  • Joseph Engelberg
  • Edward Van Wesep

Abstract

Using a sample of all academics who pass through top 50 economics and finance departments from 1996 through 2014, we study whether the granting of tenure leads faculty to pursue riskier ideas. We use the extreme tails of ex-post citations as our measure of risk and find that both the number of publications and the portion consisting of "home runs" peak at tenure and fall steadily for a decade thereafter. Similar patterns hold for faculty at elite (top 10) institutions and for faculty who take differing time to tenure. We find the opposite pattern among poorly cited publications: their numbers rise post-tenure.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Brogaard & Joseph Engelberg & Edward Van Wesep, 2018. "Do Economists Swing for the Fences after Tenure?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 179-194, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:32:y:2018:i:1:p:179-94
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.32.1.179
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Asali, 2019. "A tale of two tracks," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 323-337, May.
    2. Franklin G. Mixon, 2018. "Do academics swing for the fences after tenure? Analysis of attributions data from economics research," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 116(3), pages 2155-2160, September.
    3. Stremersch, S. & Winer, R.S., 2018. "Academic Research in Marketing and Business School Health," ERIM Report Series Research in Management 116485, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    4. João Ricardo Faria & Franklin G. Mixon, 2020. "The Peter and Dilbert Principles applied to academe," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 115-132, June.
    5. Asali, Muhammad, 2018. "A Tale of Two Academic Tracks," IZA Discussion Papers 11423, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Stremersch, S. & Winer, R.S. & Camacho, N.M.A., 2020. "Faculty Research Incentives and Business School Health: A New Perspective for Marketing," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2020-007-MKT, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    7. Corsi, Marcella & D’Ippoliti, Carlo & Zacchia, Giulia, 2019. "Diversity of backgrounds and ideas: The case of research evaluation in economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(9), pages 1-1.
    8. Stremersch, S. & Winer, R.S., 2018. "Academic Research in Marketing and Business School Health: Limiters and Improvement Opportunities," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2019-007-MKT, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    9. Rajeev K. Goel & Devrim Göktepe-Hultén, 2020. "Drivers of innovation productivity of academic researchers through career advancement," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 414-429, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General

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