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The value-added of sectoral disaggregation: Implications on competitive consequences of climate change policies

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  • Alexeeva-Talebi, Victoria
  • Böhringer, Christoph
  • Löschel, Andreas
  • Voigt, Sebastian

Abstract

Global impact assessment of unilateral climate policies is commonly based on multi-sector, multi-region computable general equilibrium (CGE) models that are calibrated to consistent accounts of production, consumption, and bilateral trade flows. However, global economic databases such as GTAP treat energy-intensive and trade-exposed industries rather in aggregate, thereby missing potentially important details on the heterogeneity of these sectors. In this paper, we elaborate on the availability of data resources and methodological issues in disaggregating energy-intensive and tradeexposed sectors that receive larger attention in the public policy debate on unilateral emission regulation: non-ferrous metals, iron and steel and non-metallic minerals. Our sensitivity analysis revolves around three types of unobserved heterogeneity at the sub-sectoral level: trade elasticities, energy consumption and technology specifications. Drawing on the example of border tax adjustments, we find that for all given technology specifications and variation in energy shares, the biggest differences emerge from variations in Armington elasticities. Even moderate changes in Armington elasticities can alter the magnitude and the sign of the effects at the sectoral level. The implications of sub-sectoral disaggregation are not as pronounced for macroeconomic indicators and leakage as for sectoral indicators. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research in its series ZEW Discussion Papers with number 12-069.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:12069

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Keywords: sectoral disaggregation; emissions trading; border adjustment; competitiveness; carbon leakage;

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  1. Katja Schumacher & Ronald D. Sands, 2006. "Where Are the Industrial Technologies in Energy-Economy Models?: An Innovative CGE Approach for Steel Production in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 605, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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Cited by:
  1. Valentina Bosetti & Marco Maffezzoli, 2013. "Taxing Carbon under Market Incompleteness," Working Papers 2013.72, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  2. Koesler, Simon, 2013. "Catching the rebound: Economy-wide implications of an efficiency shock in the provision of transport services by households," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-082, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  3. Branger, Frédéric & Quirion, Philippe, 2014. "Would border carbon adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry competitiveness losses? Insights from a meta-analysis of recent economic studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 29-39.

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