Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Miracles and Debacles: In Defense of Trade Openness

Contents:

Author Info

  • Arvind Panagariya

    (Columbia)

Abstract

The paper argues that without trade openness, there is no sustained growth and that trade is rarely responsible for stagnation or decline in incomes over a long period.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/it/papers/0403/0403002.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series International Trade with number 0403002.

as in new window
Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: 04 Mar 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0403002

Note: Type of Document - pdf; prepared on WinXP; pages: 39
Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Romain Wacziarg & Karen Horn Welch, 2003. "Trade Liberalization and Growth: New Evidence," NBER Working Papers 10152, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jagdish N. Bhagwati & T. N. Srinivasan, 1975. "Foreign Trade Regimes and Economic Development: India," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bhag75-1, July.
  3. repec:umd:umdeco:rodriguez9901 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Pritchett, Lant, 1996. "Measuring outward orientation in LDCs: Can it be done?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 307-335, May.
  5. Westphal, Larry E, 1990. "Industrial Policy in an Export-Propelled Economy: Lessons from South Korea's Experience," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 41-59, Summer.
  6. Jeffrey Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Progress of Global Integration," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1733, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  7. Francisco Rodriguez & Dani Rodrik, 1999. "Trade Policy and Economic Growth: A Skeptic's Guide to Cross-National Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7081, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Kym Anderson, 2004. "The challenge of Reducing Subsidies and Trade Barriers," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2004-12, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
  2. Kym Anderson, 2005. "On the Virtues of Multilateral Trade Negotiations," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2005-15, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
  3. Monojit Chatterji & Sushil Mohan & Sayantan Ghosh Dastidar, 2014. "Relationship Between Trade Openness And Economic Growth Of India: A Time Series Analysis," Journal of Academic Research in Economics, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Accounting and Financial Management Constanta, vol. 6(1 (March)), pages 45-69.
  4. Guillermo A. Calvo, 2008. "Crises in Emerging Markets Economies: A Global Perspective," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Kevin Cowan & Sebastián Edwards & Rodrigo O. Valdés & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmid (ed.), Current Account and External Financing, edition 1, volume 12, chapter 3, pages 085-115 Central Bank of Chile.
  5. Mishkin, Frederic S., 2009. "Globalization and financial development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 164-169, July.
  6. Yongzheng Yang & Sanjeev Gupta, 2005. "Regional Trade Arrangements in Africa," IMF Working Papers 05/36, International Monetary Fund.
  7. John Romalis, 2007. "Market Access, Openness and Growth," NBER Working Papers 13048, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Panagariya, Arvind, 2009. "Miracles and debacles revisited," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 556-572, July.
  9. Khaing, Khaing Sape Saw, 2007. "Globalization and Change of Investment Environment in ASEAN," MPRA Paper 42003, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Purba Mukerji & Arvind Panagariya, 2011. "Cost of Protection: A Second Look at the Romer Variety Effect," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 463-477, July.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0403002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.