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Are Investments in Daughters Lower When Daughters Move Away?

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Author Info

  • Michael Kevane

    (Department of Economics, Santa Clara University)

  • David I. Levine

    (Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley)

Abstract

In much of the developing world daughters receive lower education and other investments than do their brothers, and may even be so devalued as to suffer differential mortality. Daughter disadvantage may be due in part to social norms that prescribe that daughters move away from their natal family upon marriage, a practice known as virilocality. We evaluate the effects of virilocality on female disadvantage using data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey. We find little support for the hypothesis. There is no evidence that the overall pattern of rough equality in the treatment of boys and girls in Indonesia masks differences according to post-marital residential practice. Virilocal groups do not have "missing daughters." Nor is there other evidence of son preference, such as in relatively low height for- age or education for girls and women in virilocal areas. Explanations of daughter disadvantage as due to virilocality should be subject to further scrutiny and contextualization.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/dev/papers/0303/0303002.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0303002.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 25 Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0303002

Note: 31 pages, Acrobat .pdf
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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  1. Anderson, S., 1999. "The Economics of Dowry Payments in Pakistan," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 691, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Michael Kevane & David I. Levine, 2003. "Changing Status of Daughters in Indonesia," Development and Comp Systems 0303003, EconWPA.
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Cited by:
  1. repec:cge:warwcg:45 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Priebe, Jan, 2011. "Child Costs and the Causal Effect of Fertility on Female Labor Supply: An investigation for Indonesia 1993-2008," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 67, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  3. Firman Witoelar, 2005. "Inter-household Allocations within Extended Family: Evidence from the Indonesia Family Life Survey," Working Papers 912, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.

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