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The influence of the mother's power on her child's labor in Mexico

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  • Reggio, Iliana

Abstract

In order to understand what motivates parents to send their children to work, I apply a collective household model introducing child labor explicitly. Using data from Mexico, I am able to estimate the mothers' bargaining power separately from the other parameters of the model. I find that an increase in a mother's bargaining power is associated with fewer hours of work for her daughters but not for her sons. This implies that policies that target the mother as the recipient of welfare benefits, if they manage to affect the distribution of power within the household, may affect her children's work with different impacts for boys and girls. This result also suggests that the distribution of bargaining power within the household is a relevant factor that should be considered when analyzing household's decisions.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 96 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (September)
Pages: 95-105

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:96:y:2011:i:1:p:95-105

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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Keywords: Child labor Collective household models Intra-household bargaining power;

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References

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  5. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker & Omar Haider Chowdhury & Daniel L. Millimet, 1998. "Credit Programs for the Poor and the Nutritional Status of Children in Rural Bangladesh," Working Papers 98-4, Brown University, Department of Economics, revised 16 Jan 1998.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Maertens, Miet & Verhofstadt, Ellen, 2012. "Horticultural exports, female wage employment and primary school enrolment: Theory and evidence from Senegal," Working Papers 146519, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
  2. Martina Kirchberger, 2014. "Preferences over Leisure and Consumption of Siblings and Intra-Household Allocation," Economics Series Working Papers 713, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Salma Ahmed, 2011. "Trade-off between Child Labour and Schooling in Bangladesh: Role of Parental Education," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 21-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  4. Maertens, Miet & Verhofstadt, Ellen, 2013. "Horticultural exports, female wage employment and primary school enrolment: Theory and evidence from Senegal," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 118-131.
  5. Maertens, Miet & Verhofstadt, Ellen, 2012. "Horticultural exports, female wage employment and primary school enrolment: Theory and evidence from a natural quasi-experiment in Senegal," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126856, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  6. Djemai, Elodie & Arestoff, Florence, 2013. "Women's empowerment across the life cycle and generations: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/12351, Paris Dauphine University.
  7. Sonia Oreffice, 2011. "Culture and household decision making: Native and foreign-born couples' balance of power and labor supply choices in the US," Working Papers. Serie AD 2011-18, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  8. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-06 is not listed on IDEAS

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