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Effects of Household- and District-Level Factors on Primary School Enrollment in 30 Developing Countries

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  • Huisman, Janine
  • Smits, Jeroen
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    Abstract

    Summary Household- and district-level determinants of primary school enrollment are studied for 220,000 children in 340 districts of 30 developing countries using multilevel analysis. Parental decisions regarding children's education are found to be influenced by socio-economic and demographic household characteristics and characteristics of the available educational facilities, like number of teachers, percentage of female teachers, and distance to school. Other relevant context characteristics are urbanization and the position of women relative to that of men. Interaction analysis shows that many effects of household-level factors depend on the context in which the household is living.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VC6-4SY5X2G-8/2/105290bafb257911c2b8b67021b009bc
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 179-193

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:1:p:179-193

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

    Related research

    Keywords: primary enrollment gender educational facilities household-level district-level developing world;

    References

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    11. Leach, Fiona, 2006. "Researching gender violence in schools: Methodological and ethical considerations," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1129-1147, June.
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    Cited by:
    1. David Shapiro & Tesfayi Gebreselassie, 2014. "Marriage in Sub-Saharan Africa: Trends, Determinants, and Consequences," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 229-255, April.
    2. Hannum, Emily & Zhang, Yuping, 2012. "Poverty and Proximate Barriers to Learning: Vision Deficiencies, Vision Correction and Educational Outcomes in Rural Northwest China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1921-1931.
    3. Martin Piotrowski & Yok-Fong Paat, 2012. "Determinants of Educational Attainment in Rural Thailand: A Life Course Approach," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 31(6), pages 907-934, December.
    4. Christensen, Zachary & Homer, Dustin & Nielson, Daniel L., 2011. "Dodging Adverse Selection: How Donor Type and Governance Condition Aid’s Effects on School Enrollment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 2044-2053.
    5. Ellen Webbink & Jeroen Smits & Eelke Jong, 2013. "Household and Context Determinants of Child Labor in 221 Districts of 18 Developing Countries," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 819-836, January.
    6. Zeba A. Sathar & Asif Wazir & Maqsood Sadiq, 2013. "Struggling against the Odds of Poverty, Access, and Gender: Secondary Schooling for Girls in Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 18(Special E), pages 67-92, September.
    7. Lindskog, Annika, 2011. "Does a Diversification Motive Influence Children’s School Entry in the Ethiopian Highlands?," Working Papers in Economics 494, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    8. KUEPIE Mathias & SHAPIRO David & TENIKUE Michel, 2013. "Access to Schooling and Staying in School in Sub-Saharan Africa," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2013-16, CEPS/INSTEAD.
    9. Webbink, Ellen & Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke, 2012. "Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 631-642.

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