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Changing Status of Daughters in Indonesia

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  • Michael Kevane

    (Department of Economics, Santa Clara University)

  • David I. Levine

    (Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley)

Abstract

In many nations, parents exhibit a variety of behaviors that favor sons over daughters. In this paper we provide evidence suggesting that in Indonesia there is no problem of "missing daughters" and that patterns of births, birth spacing and nutrition allocations do not suggest son preference during the cohorts born from 1940's to the 1990's. In contrast, gender differences in educational attainment and inheritance were quite prevalent in the recent past. These gaps have narrowed for secondary education and inheritance, and disappeared for primary education.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/dev/papers/0303/0303003.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0303003.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 25 Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0303003

Note: 37 pages, Acrobat .pdf
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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Cited by:
  1. Subha Mani, 2008. "Is there Complete, Partial, or No Recovery from Childhood Malnutrition? Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series, Fordham University, Department of Economics dp2008-19, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
  2. Millimet, Daniel L. & Wang, Le, 2009. "Is the Quantity-Quality Trade-off a Trade-off for All, None, or Some?," IZA Discussion Papers 4078, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Levine, David & Kevane, Michael, 2003. "Are Investments in Daughters Lower when Daughters Move Away? Evidence from Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1065-1084, June.
  4. Uma Radhakrishnan, 2010. "A Dynamic Structural Model of Contraceptive Use and Employment Sector Choice for Women in Indonesia," Working Papers, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau 10-28, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  5. Kevane, Michael & Levine, David I., 2003. "Are Investments in Daughters Lower When Daughters Move Away?," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkele qt5xv3g4sd, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
  6. David I. Levine & Minnie Ames, 2003. "Gender Bias and The Indonesian Financial Crisis: Were Girls Hit Hardest?," Development and Comp Systems, EconWPA 0303001, EconWPA.
  7. Maria Carmela Lo Bue, 2014. "What drives child health improvements in Indonesian households? A micro-level perspective on complementarities in MDG achievements," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers, Courant Research Centre PEG 155, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  8. Gordon B. Dahl & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "The Demand for Sons: Evidence from Divorce, Fertility, and Shotgun Marriage," NBER Working Papers 10281, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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