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Why is Central Paris loosing jobs?

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  • Frederic Gilli

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Abstract

Brueckner et alii (1999) have explained urban population pattern through amenities distribution. Based on their model, this paper introduces a productive sector and helps understand employment suburbanization in a new way. Considering how amenities are valued, the 'people follow jobs' vs 'jobs follow people' case is discussed for CBD and hogh-brawn services firms. If they favour natural amenities, they might leave the historical center. A big constraint against that move is that the firm wants to keep its employees who may all live around the center. Despite conventionnal centripetal forces, they can settle in the suburbs before the households. People may than follow the firm in the suburbs.

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu-wien.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa03/cdrom/papers/122.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa03p122.

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Date of creation: Aug 2003
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa03p122

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  1. Gilles Duranton & Diego Puga, 2001. "From sectoral to functional urban specialisation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 20101, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Brueckner, J.K. & Thisse, J.-F. & Zenou, Y., 1996. "Why is central Paris rich and downtown Detroit poor ? An amenity-based theory," CORE Discussion Papers, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) 1996065, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  3. Fujita, Masahisa & Thisse, Jacques-Francois & Zenou, Yves, 1997. "On the Endogeneous Formation of Secondary Employment Centers in a City," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 337-357, May.
  4. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn, 2001. "Decentralized Employment and the Transformation of the American City," NBER Working Papers 8117, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Imai, Haruo, 1982. "CBD hypothesis and economies of agglomeration," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 275-299, December.
  6. Henderson, Vernon & Mitra, Arindam, 1996. "The new urban landscape: Developers and edge cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 613-643, December.
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