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Reserve requirements in the brave new macroprudential world

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  • Cordella, Tito
  • Federico, Pablo
  • Vegh, Carlos
  • Vuletin, Guillermo

Abstract

Using a new, large data set on quarterly reserve requirements for the period 1970-2011, this paper provides new evidence on the use of reserve requirements as a countercyclical macroprudential tool in developing countries. The appeal of reserve requirements lies in the pro-cyclical behavior of the exchange rate over the business cycle in developing countries. This enormously complicates the use of interest rates as a countercyclical instrument (because of its effect on the exchange rate) and calls for a second instrument. The paper suggests that conflicts may arise between the microprudential and macroprudential policy stances.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6793.

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Date of creation: 01 Feb 2014
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6793

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Keywords: Debt Markets; Emerging Markets; Currencies and Exchange Rates; Economic Theory&Research; Banks&Banking Reform;

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  1. Daniel Riera-Crichton & Carlos A. Vegh & Guillermo Vuletin, 2012. "Tax Multipliers: Pitfalls in Measurement and Identification," NBER Working Papers 18497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo & Leiderman, Leonardo, 1993. "“Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America: The Role of External Factors," MPRA Paper 7125, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Amartya Lahiri & Carlos A. Vegh, 2003. "Delaying the Inevitable: Interest Rate Defense and Balance of Payments Crises," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(2), pages 404-424, April.
  4. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2011. "A Solution to Fiscal Procyclicality: The Structural Budget Institutions Pioneered by Chile," NBER Working Papers 16945, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 1999. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," NBER Working Papers 7269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Olivier Jeanne & Robert P. Flood, 2000. "An Interest Rate Defense of a Fixed Exchange Rate?," IMF Working Papers 00/159, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2010. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Tax Changes: Estimates Based on a New Measure of Fiscal Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 763-801, June.
  8. Viktoria Hnatkovska & Amartya Lahiri & Carlos A. Vegh, 2008. "Interest Rates and the Exchange Rate: A Non-Monotonic Tale," NBER Working Papers 13925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Diaz-Alejandro, Carlos, 1985. "Good-bye financial repression, hello financial crash," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 1-24.
  10. Olivier Coibion, 2011. "Are the Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks Big or Small?," NBER Working Papers 17034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Carlos A. Végh & Guillermo Vuletin, 2011. "On Graduation from Fiscal Procyclicality," NBER Working Papers 17619, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Carlos A. Vegh & Guillermo Vuletin, 2012. "Overcoming the Fear of Free Falling: Monetary Policy Graduation in Emerging Markets," NBER Working Papers 18175, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Peter J. Montiel, 2003. "Tight Money in a Post-Crisis Defense of the Exchange Rate: What Have We Learned?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 18(1), pages 1-23.
  14. Cordella, Tito & Pienknagura, Samuel, 2013. "Macro prudential policies from a micro prudential angle," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6721, The World Bank.
  15. Christian Glocker & Pascal Towbin, 2012. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Reserve Requirements," WIFO Working Papers 420, WIFO.
  16. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  17. Jason Furman & Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1998. "Economic Crises: Evidence and Insights from East Asia," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(2), pages 1-136.
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