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Middle-income traps : a conceptual and empirical survey

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  • Im, Fernando Gabriel
  • Rosenblatt, David

Abstract

In recent years, the term"middle-income trap"has entered common parlance in the development policy community. The term itself often has not been precisely defined in the incipient literature. This paper discusses in more detail definitional issues on the so-called middle-income trap. The paper presents evidence in terms of both absolute and relative thresholds. To get a better understanding of whether the performance of the middle-income trap has been different from other income categories, the paper examines historical transition phases in the inter-country distribution of income based on previous work in the literature. Transition matrix analysis provides little support for the idea of a middle-income trap. Analysis of cross-country patterns of growth provides additional support for the conclusions in the paper, which closes with a general discussion of potential policy implications.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6594.

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Date of creation: 01 Sep 2013
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6594

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Keywords: Economic Conditions and Volatility; Economic Theory&Research; Income; Inequality; Poverty Impact Evaluation;

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References

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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Middle-income traps : a conceptual and empirical survey
    by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2013-10-15 13:21:36
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Cited by:
  1. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano, 2014. "Access to finance, product innovation and middle-income traps," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6767, The World Bank.

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