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Rising returns to schooling in Argentina, 1992-2002 : productivity or credentialism?

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  • Savanti, Maria Paula
  • Patrinos, Harry Anthony

Abstract

There has not been much change in the premium to primary education, while the returns to secondary education increased, but by less than the premium to university. The returns to incomplete university also increased significantly. There is a signal that there might be credentialism at the tertiary level, but 15 years of schooling also represents a significant threshold. The returns to schooling are higher in the private sector. There is little evidence of screening or credentialism driving the returns to schooling, which increased significantly in Argentina from 1992 to 2002.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3714.

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Date of creation: 01 Sep 2005
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3714

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  1. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
  2. Harry Anthony Patrinos, 1996. "Non-linearities in the returns to education: sheepskin effects or threshold levels of human capital?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 171-173.
  3. Arnaud Chevalier & Colm Harmon & Ian Walker & Yu Zhu, 2003. "Does education raise productivity, or just reflect it?," Working Papers 200304, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  4. Hungerford, Thomas & Solon, Gary, 1987. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 175-77, February.
  5. Jhon James Mora, 2003. "Sheepskin effects and screening in Colombia," COLOMBIAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL, UN - RCE - CID.
  6. Jaeger, David A & Page, Marianne E, 1996. "Degrees Matter: New Evidence on Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 733-40, November.
  7. Ana M. Ferrer & W. Craig Riddell, 2002. "The role of credentials in the Canadian labour market," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 879-905, November.
  8. G. Reza Arabsheibani & Lamine Manfor, 2001. "Non-Linearities in Returns to Education in Libya," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 139-144.
  9. Marta Sanmartin, 2001. "Linearity of the return to education and self selection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 133-142.
  10. Mehta, Aashish & Villarreal, Hector J., 2003. "Returns to Schooling, Institutions and Heterogeneous Diploma Effects: An Expanded Mincerian Framework applied to Mexico," Staff Paper Series 465, University of Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics.
  11. John Heywood & Xiangdong Wei, 2004. "Education and Signaling: Evidence from a Highly Competitive Labor Market," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 1-16.
  12. Psacharopoulos, George, 1979. "On the weak versus the strong version of the screening hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 181-185.
  13. Layard, Richard & Psacharopoulos, George, 1974. "The Screening Hypothesis and the Returns to Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 985-98, Sept./Oct.
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Cited by:
  1. Bozzoli Carlos G. & Quintana-Domeque Climent, 2013. "The Weight of the Crisis: Evidence from Newborns in Argentina," Working Papers 2013125, Fundacion BBVA / BBVA Foundation.
  2. López Bóo, Florencia, 2010. "Returns to Education and Macroeconomic Shocks: Evidence from Argentina," IZA Discussion Papers 4753, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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