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Does temporary migration have to be permanent?

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  • Amin, Mohammad
  • Mattoo, Aaditya

Abstract

The choice between temporary and permanent migration is today central to the design of migration policies. The authors draw a distinction between the two types of migration on the basis of the associated social cost and the dynamics of learning by migrants. They find that unilateral migration policies are globally inefficient because they lead to too much permanent migration and too little temporary and overall migration. Existing international agreements on labor mobility, such as the World Trade Organization's General Agreement on Trade in Services, have failed to do better because they seek primarily to induce host countries to make commitments to allow entry. Instead, Pareto gains and more liberal migration could be achieved through multilateral agreements that enable host countries to commit to repatriation.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3582.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 2005
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3582

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Related research

Keywords: Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement; International Migration; Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Anthropology; Human Migrations&Resettlements;

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References

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  1. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Sinnott, Richard, 2006. "The determinants of individual attitudes towards immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 838-861, December.
  2. Storesletten, Kjetil, 1998. "Sustaining Fiscal Policy Through Immigration," Seminar Papers 664, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  3. Stark, Oded & Wang, Yong, 2001. "Inducing Human Capital Formation: Migration as a Substitute for Subsidies," Economics Series 100, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  4. Hillel Rapoport & Avi Weiss, 2001. "The Optimal Size for a Minority," Working Papers 2001-01, Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University.
  5. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Dustmann, Christian & Preston, Ian, 2000. "Racial and Economic Factors in Attitudes to Immigration," CEPR Discussion Papers 2542, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Becker, Gary S., 1971. "The Economics of Discrimination," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226041162, June.
  8. Angrist, Joshua & Kugler, Adriana, 2002. "Protective or Counter-Productive? Labor Market Institutions and the Effect Immigration on EU Natives," IZA Discussion Papers 433, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Cohen Goldner, Sarit & Eckstein, Zvi, 2002. "Labor Mobility of Immigrants: Training, Experience, Language and Opportunities," IZA Discussion Papers 519, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Yegorov, Yuri, 1997. "Migrants' Savings, Purchasing Power Parity, and the Optimal Duration of Migration," Economics Series 44, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  11. Hill, John K., 1987. "Immigrant decisions concerning duration of stay and migratory frequency," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 221-234, February.
  12. Dustmann, Christian & Kirchkamp, Oliver, 2001. "The Optimal Migration Duration and Activity Choice after Re-migration," IZA Discussion Papers 266, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Giovanni Maggi, 1999. "The Role of Multilateral Institutions in International Trade Cooperation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 190-214, March.
  14. Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Who Is Against Immigration? A Cross-Country Investigation of Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 510-530, August.
  15. Commander, Simon & Kangasniemi, Mari & Winters, L. Alan, 2003. "The Brain Drain: Curse or Boon?," IZA Discussion Papers 809, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  16. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," NBER Working Papers 4955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Knack, Stephen & Keefer, Philip, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-88, November.
  18. Ellerman, David, 2003. "Policy research on migration and development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3117, The World Bank.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Pia R. Pinger, 2007. "Come Back or Stay? Spend Here or There? Temporary versus Permanent Migration and Remittance Patterns in the Republic of Moldova," Kiel Advanced Studies Working Papers 438, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  2. BERNARD HOEKMAN & ÇAĞLAR ÖZDEN, 2010. "The Euro-Mediterranean Partnership: Trade in Services as an Alternative to Migration?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48, pages 835-857, 09.
  3. Schiff, Maurice, 2007. "Optimal Immigration Policy: Permanent, Guest-Worker, or Mode IV?," IZA Discussion Papers 2871, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Luthria, Manjula, 2011. "Labor Mobility for the Poor: Is it Really Possible?," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 45, pages 1-6, January.
  5. KOUNI, Mohamed, 2008. "Choix d’une meilleure politique d’émigration : Modélisation de stratégies et simulation du modèle
    [Choice of a better emigration policy: Modeling of strategies and simulation of the model]
    ," MPRA Paper 30628, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Manjula Luthria, 2011. "Labor Mobility for the Poor : Is it Really Possible?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10112, The World Bank.

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