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Policy research on migration and development

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  • Ellerman, David
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    Abstract

    This is a survey and analysis-with commentary-of migration issues and the related development policies for the sending countries."Migration and development"is considered an unsettled and unresolved area for good reason. The policy issues are surprisingly deep and run to basic issues such as the nature of development as opposed to simple poverty reduction. North-north migration (between industrial countries), south-south migration (between or within developing countries), and north-south migration (from developing to industrial countries) are all covered although the paper focuses on the north-south variety. Attention is paid to the question of the dynamic mechanism underlying migration being one of convergence or divergence. Very often the policy issues push one outside what would be narrowly considered as"migration studies."For example, policies to reduce the brain drain go directly to the issue of educational reform in developing countries while policies to increase the developmental impact of remittances quickly carry one into the nature of business development itself. Ronald Dore's ideas on educational reform are outlined as a policy approach to the brain drain problem. Jane Jacobs'ideas on development are outlined in greater length as they are little known in development economics and yet directly address the policy issues raised by migration and development.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3117.

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    Date of creation: 31 Aug 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3117

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    Related research

    Keywords: Banks&Banking Reform; Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Human Migrations&Resettlements; Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement; Public Health Promotion; Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Banks&Banking Reform; Human Migrations&Resettlements; Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement; Municipal Financial Management;

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Devesh Kapur, 2001. "Diasporas and Technology Transfer," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 265-286.
    2. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262650592, December.
    3. Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1998. "The Age of Mass Migration: Causes and Economic Impact," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195116519.
    4. Lant Pritchett, 1997. "Divergence, Big Time," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 3-17, Summer.
    5. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
    6. Herbert A. Simon, 1991. "Organizations and Markets," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 25-44, Spring.
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    Cited by:
    1. Amin, Mohammad & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2005. "Does temporary migration have to be permanent?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3582, The World Bank.
    2. Solimano, Andres, 2003. "Remittances by Emigrants: Issues and Evidence," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Ann Issac & Nirmalya Syam, 2010. "Migration of Health Care Professionals from India: A Case Study of Nurses," Working Papers id:2403, eSocialSciences.

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