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Does Migration Lead to Development? Or is it Contributing to a Global Divide?

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  • Annelies Zoomers

    ()
    (International Development Studies, Department of Human Geography and Planning, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3508 TC, Utrecht, The Netherlands)

  • Gery Nijenhuis

    (International Development Studies, Department of Human Geography and Planning, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3508 TC, Utrecht, The Netherlands)

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    Abstract

    This article aims to show that the benefits of international migration (often presented as a ‘global flow’) very much depend on the positionality of the areas involved, as well as the regional particularities. It is argued that countries producing south-north migration or diasporic states are in a more favorable position to benefit from international migration than countries that are mainly involved in south-south migration. In addition, the opportunity to benefit from international migration very much depends on geographical particularities. For example, international migration in the context of Latin America/USA is in many respects not comparable to what is happening in Africa, Asia, the EU and the Gulf States. Even though international migration is often described in terms of a growing connectedness in the age of globalization, it progresses also hand in hand with new gaps and regional divides.

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    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4698/2/3/122/pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Societies.

    Volume (Year): 2 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 122-138

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    Handle: RePEc:gam:jsoctx:v:2:y:2012:i:3:p:122-138:d:20037

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    Related research

    Keywords: international migration; development; south-north migration; south-south migration; diasporic states; migration flows; regional differences;

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    1. Stark, Oded & Levhari, David, 1982. "On Migration and Risk in LDCs," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 191-96, October.
    2. Todaro, Michael P, 1969. "A Model for Labor Migration and Urban Unemployment in Less Developed Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 59(1), pages 138-48, March.
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