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Migration of Health Care Professionals from India: A Case Study of Nurses

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  • Ann Issac
  • Nirmalya Syam
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    Abstract

    The study attempts to examine why there is staff shortage of health care professionals especially the nurses in India and the impact of such migration on services like emergency preparedness, quality of care, patient safety and access to needed health care services especially for vulnerable populations.

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    File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=Document1422010240.6798212.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=2403&fref=repec
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:2403.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2403

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    Web page: http://www.esocialsciences.org

    Related research

    Keywords: nurses; migration; professional migration; Mode 4 services; India; humanpower; manpower; Sociology; migration studies; health professionals; nursing education; medical education; health personnel; health manpower; health care; hospitals; nursing care;

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    1. Markus Krajewski, 2003. "Public Services and Trade Liberalization: Mapping the Legal Framework," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(2), pages 341-367, June.
    2. Bauer, Thomas & Epstein, Gil S & Gang, Ira, 2002. "Herd Effects or Migration Networks? The Location Choice of Mexican Immigrants in the US," CEPR Discussion Papers 3505, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Chiha, Yvana A. & Link, Charles R., 2003. "The shortage of registered nurses and some new estimates of the effects of wages on registered nurses labor supply: a look at the past and a preview of the 21st century," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 349-375, June.
    4. Stephen Pudney & Michael Shields, . "Gender, Race, Pay and Promotion in the British Nursing Profession: Estimation of a Generalised Ordered Probit Model," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 97/4, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    5. Rupa Chanda, 2008. "Trade in Health Services," Working Papers id:1758, eSocialSciences.
    6. Stark, Oded, 2004. "Rethinking the Brain Drain," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 15-22, January.
    7. Irene Hardill & Sandra Macdonald, 2000. "Skilled International Migration: The Experience of Nurses in the UK," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(7), pages 681-692.
    8. Ellerman, David, 2003. "Policy research on migration and development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3117, The World Bank.
    9. Astor, Avraham & Akhtar, Tasleem & Matallana, MarĂ­a Alexandra & Muthuswamy, Vasantha & Olowu, Folarin A. & Tallo, Veronica & Lie, Reidar K., 2005. "Physician migration: Views from professionals in Colombia, Nigeria, India, Pakistan and the Philippines," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(12), pages 2492-2500, December.
    10. Michael A. Shields, 2004. "Addressing nurse shortages: what can policy makers learn from the econometric evidence on nurse labour supply?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(499), pages F464-F498, November.
    11. Goldfarb, Robert & Havrylyshyn, Oli & Mangum, Stephen, 1984. "Can remittances compensate for manpower outflows : The case of Philippine physicians," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1-3), pages 1-17.
    12. Phillips, V. L., 1995. "Nurses' labor supply: Participation, hours of work, and discontinuities in the supply function," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 567-582, December.
    13. Ojo, Kenneth Olayinka, 1990. "International migration of health manpower in Sub-Saharan Africa," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 631-637, January.
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