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Immigration, Trade, and Austrian Unemployment

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  • Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf
  • Zweimüller, Josef

Abstract

In this paper we look at the effects of immigration and trade with Eastern Europe on unemployment in Austria. Using individual data over the period 1989-92 of male blue-collar workers employed in the Austrian manufacturing sector, we decompose possible detrimental impacts in unemployment entry effects and unemployment duration effects. We find that unemployment entry does not seem to be strongly affected by the recent increase in the flow of immigrants. This is different from the immigration effect on unemployment duration. Within almost all subgroups there is a significant increase in the length of unemployment spells as a result of increased immigration. Increased trade with Central and East European Countries (CEECs) seems to have increased the risk of unemployment entry, and to a lesser extent also the duration of unemployment. This is different from trade with the rest of the world, where export increases have an unemployment reducing effect.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 1346.

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Date of creation: Feb 1996
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1346

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Keywords: Immigration; Labour Market; Trade; Unemployment;

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References

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  1. Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf & Zweimüller, Josef, 1994. "Immigration and the Earnings of Young Native Workers," CEPR Discussion Papers 936, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Aiginger, Karl & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf & Zweimüller, Josef, 1995. "East European Trade and the Austrian Labour Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 1168, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Noel Gaston & Daniel Trefler, 1994. "The Role of International Trade and Trade Policy in the Labour Markets of Canada and the United States," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 45-62, 01.
  4. Brown, D.K., 1992. "The Impact of a North American Free Trade Area: Applied General Equilibrium Models," Working Papers 311, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  5. repec:fth:michin:313 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Gene M. Grossman, 1986. "Imports as a Cause of Injury: The Case of the U.S. Steel Industry," NBER Working Papers 1494, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Douglas L. Kruse, 1988. "International trade and the labor market experience of displaced workers," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 41(3), pages 402-417, April.
  8. Muhleisen, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 1994. "A panel analysis of job changes and unemployment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 793-801, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Vincent Fromentin, 2012. "Migration and unemployment duration in OECD countries: A dynamic panel analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(2), pages 1113-1124.
  2. Joshua D. Angrist & Adriana D. Kugler, 2001. "Protective or counter-productive? Labor market institutions and the effect of immigration on EU natives," Economics Working Papers 587, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  3. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2011. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-32, Spring.
  4. Giovanni Peri, 2005. "Skills and Talent of Immigrants:A Comparison between the European Union and the United States," Working Papers 524, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  5. Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2010. "Qualification Structure, Over- and Underqualification of the Foreign Born in Austria and the EU," FIW Research Reports series II-008, FIW.
  6. Angrist, Joshua & Kugler, Adriana, 2002. "Protective or Counter-Productive? Labor Market Institutions and the Effect Immigration on EU Natives," IZA Discussion Papers 433, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Joshua Angrist & Adriana Kugler, 2001. "Protective or Counter-Productive? European Labor Market Institutions and the Effect of Immigrants on EU Natives," NBER Working Papers 8660, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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