Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

A Regional Model of Endogenous Growth with Creative Destruction

Contents:

Author Info

Abstract

We examine endogenous growth through vertical innovations in a two region model with partial regional and varietal knowledge spillovers. This paper extends the growth literature by adding a regional endogenous growth model with improvements in product quality, instead of a product variety engine for growth, where we account for partial knowledge spillovers in R&D. Starting with the quality ladders endogenous growth model we add traditional goods production by unskilled workers, location as a factor in R&D spillovers, migration of knowledge workers and vary the freeness of trade. Production of each manufactured variety is contestable through vertical innovation based on available knowledge and as a result, firms choose a location to maximise the productivity of R&D, maintain their niche monopoly and minimise transport costs. With contestability, knowledge spillovers provide for additional growth and the partial nature of spillovers causes an additional clustering effect encouraging agglomeration. Growth is highest when there is full agglomeration in one location, as knowledge spillovers are greater with manufacturing concentration. Agglomerated locations are reliant on local inter-varietal knowledge spillovers for growth while peripheral locations rely on trade and regional knowledge spillovers. In the long run, locations experience equal growth rates. If a location becomes agglomerated, it has higher long-run wages and higher growth rates during the transition to the long run. The model offers policy implications for lagging economies to improve inter-regional knowledge spillovers while agglomerated economies should be more concerned with business interaction within the region. Policies which reduce barriers to migration will increase long run growth rates by accelerating the transition to agglomeration.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: ftp://mngt.waikato.ac.nz/RePEc/wai/econwp/1202.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Waikato, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 12/02.

as in new window
Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 07 Apr 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wai:econwp:12/02

Note: Revised: 2012-09-01
Contact details of provider:
Postal: Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand, 3240
Phone: + 64 (0)7 838 4758 (Administrator)
Fax: + 64 7 838 4331
Email:
Web page: http://cms.mngt.waikato.ac.nz/departments/economics
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: endogenous growth; new economic geography; innovation; knowledge spillovers; agglomeration; quality ladders; creative destruction;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1990. "A Model of Growth Through Creative Destruction," NBER Working Papers 3223, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Philip McCann, 2007. "Sketching Out a Model of Innovation, Face-to-face Interaction and Economic Geography," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 117-134.
  3. Koen Frenken & Ron A. Boschma, 2007. "A theoretical framework for Evolutionary Economic Geography: Industrial dynamics and urban growth as a branching process," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0701, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Mar 2007.
  4. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  5. Gilles Duranton & Michael Storper, 2005. "Rising trade costs?: agglomeration and trade with endogenous transaction costs," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19898, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Baldwin, Richard E & Forslid, Rikard, 2000. "The Core-Periphery Model and Endogenous Growth: Stabilizing and Destabilizing Integration," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(267), pages 307-24, August.
  7. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Alwyn Young, 1998. "Growth without Scale Effects," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(1), pages 41-63, February.
  9. Martin, Philippe & I.P. Ottaviano, Gianmarco, 1999. "Growing locations: Industry location in a model of endogenous growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 281-302, February.
  10. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
  11. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth Through Creative Destruction," Scholarly Articles 12490578, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
  13. Martin, Philippe, 1999. "Public policies, regional inequalities and growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 85-105, July.
  14. Kyoko Hirose & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2007. "Knowledge spillovers, location of industry, and endogenous growth," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 17-30, March.
  15. Yamamoto, Kazuhiro, 2003. "Agglomeration and growth with innovation in the intermediate goods sector," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 335-360, May.
  16. T. W. Swan, 1956. "ECONOMIC GROWTH and CAPITAL ACCUMULATION," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(2), pages 334-361, November.
  17. Alessandra Faggian & Philip McCann, 2009. "Human capital, graduate migration and innovation in British regions," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(2), pages 317-333, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Fujishima, Shota, 2013. "Growth, agglomeration, and urban congestion," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1168-1181.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wai:econwp:12/02. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Brian Silverstone).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.