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Heterogeneous Beliefs and the Cross-Section of Asset Returns

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Abstract

When agents have irrational beliefs which are rational on average, it has been shown that the effect of their trades does not cancel out in general and can lead to time variations in market price of risk and volatility. In this paper, we follow the differences-in-opinion approach and show that the impact of unbiased disagreement on market equilibrium is much stronger in a multi-asset market than in a single-asset market, in which the impact of small disagreement may be negligible. More importantly, we show that different type of disagreement contribute significantly to explain the cross-section of expected returns, volatility and covariance between asset returns. In particular, disagreement can lead to excess volatility, a positive (negative) excess covariance when optimism/pessimism are positively (negatively) correlated between assets and the level of disagreement is negatively (positively) related to expected future returns when the relatively optimistic agent has a larger (smaller) wealth share than the pessimistic agent.

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File URL: http://www.qfrc.uts.edu.au/research/research_papers/rp303.pdf
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Paper provided by Quantitative Finance Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney in its series Research Paper Series with number 303.

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Length: 30
Date of creation: 01 Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uts:rpaper:303

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Keywords: disagreement; multi-asset market; expected excess returns; excess volatility; excess covariance;

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  1. Jaksa Cvitanic & Fernando Zapatero, 2004. "Introduction to the Economics and Mathematics of Financial Markets," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262532654, December.
  2. Elyès Jouini & Clotilde Napp, 2003. "Consensus consumer and intertemporal asset pricing with heterogeneous beliefs," Finance 0312001, EconWPA.
  3. Masahiro Watanabe, 2008. "Price Volatility and Investor Behavior in an Overlapping Generations Model with Information Asymmetry," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(1), pages 229-272, 02.
  4. Andrea Buraschi & Alexei Jiltsov, 2006. "Model Uncertainty and Option Markets with Heterogeneous Beliefs," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(6), pages 2841-2897, December.
  5. Elyès Jouini & Clotilde Napp, 2010. "Unbiased Disagreement in financial markets, waves of pessimism and the risk return tradeoff," Post-Print halshs-00488481, HAL.
  6. Raman Uppal & Harjoat Bhamra, 2013. "Asset Prices with Heterogeneity in Preferences and Beliefs," 2013 Meeting Papers 1344, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Jouini, Elyès & Napp, Clotilde, 2007. "Consensus Consumer and Intertemporal Asset Pricing with Heterogeneous Beliefs," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/78, Paris Dauphine University.
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