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Skill-biased technical change: On technology and wages in the Netherlands

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Author Info

  • Bruinshoofd,Allard
  • Weel,Bas,ter

    (MERIT)

Abstract

This paper investigates the shift in demand away from low-skilled and towards high-skilled labour in the Netherlands over the 1990s. Making the distinction between the effects of technical change on job type and job level, the conclusion is that skill-biased technical change based on job level is the chief cause for this shift.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT) in its series Research Memorandum with number 021.

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Date of creation: 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unm:umamer:1998021

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Web page: http://www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/
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Keywords: labour economics ;

References

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  1. Bartel, A.P. & Sicherman, N., 1995. "Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers," Papers 95-10, Columbia - Graduate School of Business.
  2. Michael Denny & Melvyn Fuss, 1983. "The Effects of Factor Prices and Technological Change on the Occupational Demand for Labor: Evidence from Canadian Telecommunications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 18(2), pages 161-176.
  3. Edward N. Wolff, 1998. "Technology and the Demand for Skills," Macroeconomics 9810004, EconWPA.
  4. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1997. "Endogenous Growth Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262011662, December.
  5. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1998. "The Origins Of Technology-Skill Complementarity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 113(3), pages 693-732, August.
  6. Kevin M. Murphy & W. Craig Riddell & Paul M. Romer, 1998. "Wages, Skills, and Technology in the United States and Canada," NBER Working Papers 6638, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Doms, Mark & Dunne, Timothy & Troske, Kenneth R, 1997. "Workers, Wages, and Technology," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(1), pages 253-90, February.
  8. Meghir, Costas & Whitehouse, Edward, 1996. "The Evolution of Wages in the United Kingdom: Evidence from Micro Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(1), pages 1-25, January.
  9. James J. Heckman & Lance Lochner & Christopher Taber, 1998. "Explaining Rising Wage Inequality: Explorations with a Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Labor Earnings with Heterogeneous Agents," NBER Working Papers 6384, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Nickell, Stephen & Bell, Brian, 1995. "The Collapse in Demand for the Unskilled and Unemployment across the OECD," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 40-62, Spring.
  11. Alessandra Colecchia & George Papaconstantinou, 1996. "The Evolution of Skills in OECD Countries and the Role of Technology," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 1996/8, OECD Publishing.
  12. Nachum Sicherman, 1987. "Over-Education in the Labor Market," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 48, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  13. Cohn, Elchanan & Khan, Shahina P., 1995. "The wage effects of overschooling revisited," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 67-76, March.
  14. Groot, Wim, 1993. "Overeducation and the returns to enterprise-related schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 299-309, December.
  15. DiNardo, John E & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1997. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(1), pages 291-303, February.
  16. Griliches, Zvi, 1969. "Capital-Skill Complementarity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(4), pages 465-68, November.
  17. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. World Bank, 2001. "Mexico : Technology, Wages and Employment, Volume 1. Main Document," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15432, The World Bank.
  2. Bruinshoofd,Allard & Hollanders,Hugo & Weel,Bas,ter, 1999. "Knowledge Spillovers and Wage Inequality: An Empirical Investigation of Knowledge-Skill Complementarity," Research Memorandum 008, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  3. Ochsen, Carsten, 2004. "Zukunft der Arbeit und Arbeit der Zukunft in Deutschland," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 45, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.

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