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Technology and the Wage Structure

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  • Steven G. Allen

Abstract

This paper reports direct evidence on how recent changes in technology are related to changes in wage differentials by schooling, experience, and gender. Wage differentials by industry in the full- year 1979 and 1989 Current Population Surveys are related to R&D intensity, usage of high-tech capital, recentness of technology, growth in total factor productivity, and growth of the capital-labor ratio. Returns to schooling are larger in industries that are intensive in R&D and high-tech capital. Technology variables account for 30 percent of the increase in the wage gap between college and high school graduates.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 5534.

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Date of creation: Apr 1996
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Publication status: published as Allen, Steven G. "Technology And The Wage Structure," Journal of Labor Economics, 2001, v19(2,Apr), 440-483.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5534

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