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Job Matching and Wage Growth in the U.S. and Germany

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  • Kenneth A. Counch

    (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

This paper examines the contribution of job matching to wage growth in the U.S. and Germany using data drawn from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the German Socio-Economic Panel from 1984 through 1992. Using a symmetrical set of variables and data handling procedures, real wage growth is found to be higher in the U.S. than in Germany during this period. Also, using two different estimators, job matches are found to enhance wage growth in the U.S. and retard it in Germany. The relationship of general skills to employment in each country appears responsible for this result.

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File URL: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/working/2003-10.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2003-10.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2003-10

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Postal: University of Connecticut 341 Mansfield Road, Unit 1063 Storrs, CT 06269-1063
Phone: (860) 486-4889
Fax: (860) 486-4463
Web page: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/
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References

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