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Dismissal Protection or Wage Flexibility

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  • Jens Rubart

    ()
    (Institute of Economics Darmstadt University of Technology)

Abstract

Due to increased technological change which lead to an increased demand for skilled workers, it becomes more and more difficult for low skilled workers to find a job. How should a society or political decision makers react? Recently, German politicians are engaged in a discussion about the introduction of combined and minimum wages as well as the reduction of employment protection mechanisms in order to increase the employment status of low skilled workers. However, a detailed macroeconomic examination of the effects of the above mentioned labor market policies in an environment which exhibits structural changes is still missing. Based on recent findings by Lindquist (2004) and Pierrard and Sneessens (2004), in this paper a dynamic general equilibrium model with equilibrium unemployment due to search an matching frictions is developed. Within this framework, the effects of labor market policies, in particular the introduction of minimum wages and firing costs, are analyzed. We show that a reduction of employment protection mechanisms are rather ineffective to increase the employment status of low skilled workers. However, it is shown that the higher a relative wage rigidity is the lower is low skilled employment

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Computational Economics in its series Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 with number 406.

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Date of creation: 04 Jul 2006
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Handle: RePEc:sce:scecfa:406

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Keywords: DGE Model; Heterogeneous Labor; Skill Biased Technological Change; Search Unemployment; Employment Protection; Minimum Wages;

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Cited by:
  1. Rubart, Jens & Semmler, Willi, 2007. "East German Unemployment from a Macroeconomic Perspective," Darmstadt Discussion Papers in Economics 35712, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute of Economics (VWL).

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