Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Reallocation and the Changing Nature of Economic Fluctuations

Contents:

Author Info

  • Eric Sims

    (University of Notre Dame)

  • Michael Jason Pries

    (University of Notre Dame)

Abstract

We document several important changes in the nature of economic fluctuations that coincide with the onset of the Great Moderation and the Jobless Recoveries phenomenon. Labor productivity turned from strongly procyclical to countercyclical; sectoral reallocation of labor increased and became less temporally concentrated in the initial stages of a recession; much of the reduction in volatility of various aggregate time series was concentrated in the higher frequency component of those series, while the switch in cyclicality is concentrated in the medium frequency component; the ``efficiency wedge'' declined in importance relative to the ``labor wedge''. We construct a model of labor reallocation that can account for these facts.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2011/paper_1258.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2011 Meeting Papers with number 1258.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:red:sed011:1258

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
Fax: 1-314-444-8731
Email:
Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/society.htm
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Barnichon, Regis, 2010. "Productivity and unemployment over the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(8), pages 1013-1025, November.
  2. Daniel Aaronson & Ellen Rissman & Daniel G. Sullivan, 2004. "Can sectoral reallocation explain the jobless recovery?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 36-39.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Carlos Carrillo-Tudela & Ludo Visschers, 2013. "Unemployment and endogenous reallocation over the business cycle," Economics Working Papers we1302, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  2. Jacob Wong, 2012. "Aggregate Reallocation Shocks and the Dynamics of Occupational Mobility and Wage Inequality," School of Economics Working Papers 2012-04, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  3. Edward Prescott & Ellen McGrattan, 2012. "The Labor Productivity Puzzle," 2012 Meeting Papers 644, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    • Ellen R. McGrattan & Edward C. Prescott, 2012. "The Labor Productivity Puzzle," Book Chapters, in: Lee E. Ohanian & John B. Taylor & Ian J. Wright (ed.), Government Policies and the Delayed Economic Recovery, chapter 6 Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
  4. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-01 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Francesco Furlanett & Nicolas Groshenny, 2012. "Matching efficiency and business cycle fluctuations," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2012/06, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  6. Kevin x.d. Huang & Jie Chen & Zhe Li & Jianfei Sun, . "Financial Conditions and Slow Recoveries," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers vuecon-sub-14-00004, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:red:sed011:1258. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Zimmermann).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.