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Time Variation in U.S. Wage Dynamics

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  • B. HOFMANN
  • G. PEERSMAN

    ()

  • R. STRAUB

Abstract

This paper explores time variation in the dynamic effects of technology shocks on U.S. output, prices, interest rates as well as real and nominal wages. The results indicate considerable time variation in U.S. wage dynamics that can be linked to the monetary policy regime. Before and after the "Great Inflation", nominal wages moved in the same direction as the (required) adjustment of real wages, and in the opposite direction of the price response. During the "Great Inflation", technology shocks in contrast triggered wage-price spirals, moving nominal wages and prices in the same direction at longer horizons, thus counteracting the required adjustment of real wages, amplifying the ultimate repercussions on prices and hence increasing inflation volatility. Using a standard DSGE model, we show that these stylized facts, in particular the estimated magnitudes, can only be explained by assuming a high degree of wage indexation in conjunction with a weak reaction of monetary policy to inflation during the "Great Inflation", and low indexation together with aggressive inflation stabilization of monetary policy before and after this period. This means that the monetary policy regime is not only captured by the parameters of the monetary policy rule, but importantly also by the degree of wage indexation and resultant second round effects in the labor market. Accordingly, the degree of wage indexation is not structural in the sense of Lucas (1976).

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its series Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium with number 10/691.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:10/691

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Keywords: technology shocks; second-round effects; Great Inflation;

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Cited by:
  1. Seonghoon Cho & Koen Inghelbrecht & Geert Bekaert & Antonio Moreno & Lieven Baele, 2011. "Macroeconomic Regimes," 2011 Meeting Papers 817, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Julio A. Carrillo & Gert Peersman & Joris Wauters, 2013. "Endogenous Wage Indexation and Aggregate Shocks," Working Papers 2013-19, Banco de México.
  3. Tillmann, Peter & Wolters, Maik H., 2014. "The changing dynamics of US inflation persistence: A quantile regression approach," Economics Working Papers 2014-09, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
  4. Juli?n Messina & Anna Sanz-de-Galdeano, 2014. "Wage Rigidity and Disinflation in Emerging Countries," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 102-33, January.
  5. Champagne, Julien & Kurmann, André, 2013. "The great increase in relative wage volatility in the United States," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 166-183.
  6. Berg, Tim Oliver, 2011. "Technology news and the U.S. economy: Time variation and structural changes," MPRA Paper 35361, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Joris de Wind & Luca Gambetti, 2014. "Reduced-rank time-varying vector autoregressions," CPB Discussion Paper 270, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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