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Matched panel data estimates of the impact of Teach First on school and departmental performance

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  • Rebecca Allen

    ()
    (Institute of Education, University of London)

  • Jay Allnutt

    ()
    (Teach First, London)

Abstract

In this paper we evaluate whether the placement of Teach First’s carefully selected, yet inexperienced new teachers into deprived secondary schools in England has altered the educational outcomes of pupils at the age of 16. Our difference-in-difference panel estimation approach matches schools participating early on in the scheme to those within the same region. We find the programme has not been damaging to schools who joined and most likely produced school-wide gains in GCSE results in the order of 5% of a pupil standard deviation or around one grade in one of the pupil’s best eight subjects. We estimate pupil point-in-time fixed effect models to identify core subject departmental gains of over 5% of a subject grade resulting from placing a Teach First participant in a teaching team of six teachers.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London in its series DoQSS Working Papers with number 13-11.

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Date of creation: 03 Sep 2013
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Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1311

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Keywords: teacher preparation; school performance; teacher effectiveness;

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  1. Donald Boyd & Pamela Grossman & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2006. "How Changes in Entry Requirements Alter the Teacher Workforce and Affect Student Achievement," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 1(2), pages 176-216, April.
  2. Glewwe, Paul & Hanushek, Eric & Humpage, Sarah & Ravina, Renato, 2012. "School Resources and Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: A Review of the Literature from 1990 to 2010," Working Papers 120033, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
  3. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Daniel M. O'Brien & Steven G. Rivkin, 2005. "The Market for Teacher Quality," NBER Working Papers 11154, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Rebecca Allen & Simon Burgess & Jennifer Mayo, 2012. "The teacher labour market, teacher turnover and disadvantaged schools: new evidence for England," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 12/294, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  5. Kane, Thomas J. & Rockoff, Jonah E. & Staiger, Douglas O., 2008. "What does certification tell us about teacher effectiveness? Evidence from New York City," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 615-631, December.
  6. C. Kirabo Jackson & Elias Bruegmann, 2009. "Teaching Students and Teaching Each Other: The Importance of Peer Learning for Teachers," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(4), pages 85-108, October.
  7. Daniel Aaronson & Lisa Barrow & William Sander, 2002. "Teachers and student achievement in the Chicago public high schools," Working Paper Series WP-02-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  8. Paul T. Decker & Daniel P. Mayer & Steven Glazerman, 2004. "The Effects of Teach For America on Students: Findings from a National Evaluation," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 4150, Mathematica Policy Research.
  9. Ashenfelter, Orley C, 1978. "Estimating the Effect of Training Programs on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 47-57, February.
  10. Paul T. Decker & Daniel P. Mayer & Steven Glazerman, 2004. "The Effects of Teach For America on Students: Findings from a National Evaluation," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 4012, Mathematica Policy Research.
  11. Antecol, Heather & Eren, Ozkan & Ozbeklik, Serkan, 2013. "The effect of Teach for America on the distribution of student achievement in primary school: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 113-125.
  12. Clotfelter, Charles T. & Ladd, Helen F. & Vigdor, Jacob L., 2007. "Teacher credentials and student achievement: Longitudinal analysis with student fixed effects," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 673-682, December.
  13. Jonah E. Rockoff, 2004. "The Impact of Individual Teachers on Student Achievement: Evidence from Panel Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 247-252, May.
  14. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
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