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Geographic, Gender and Skill Structure of International Migration

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Author Info

  • Docquier, Frédéric
  • Marfouk, Abdeslam
  • Özden, Caglar
  • Parsons, Christopher

Abstract

This paper presents a new bilateral database documenting international migration stocks by gender, education level, origin and destination. We build on existing databases of OECD host countries in 1990 and 2000 and expand their coverage by collecting or estimating migration to all non-OECD destinations. The end result is comprised of comprehensive 195x195 matrices of international migration for 1990 and 2000, distinguishing migrants by gender and education (college educated and the less educated). This unique database allows us to characterize the origin, destination and education levels of about 100 million adult migrants in 2000, and 80 million in 1990. We identify the main sending and receiving countries and the largest migration corridors. South-North corridors are dominant in 2000, exhibiting the largest growth rates and skill intensity. Accounting for migration to high-income non-OECD countries and numerous developing countries drastically improves our understanding of global migration patterns.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 47917.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:47917

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Related research

Keywords: International migration; labor mobility; brain drain.;

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References

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  1. Parsons, Christopher R. & Skeldon, Ronald & Walmsley, Terrie L. & Winters, L. Alan, 2007. "Quantifying international migration : a database of bilateral migrant stocks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4165, The World Bank.
  2. Spilimbergo, Antonio, 2006. "Democracy and Foreign Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 5934, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Frederic DOCQUIER & Elisabetta LODIGIANI & Hillel RAPOPORT & Maurice SCHIFF, 2010. "Emigration and the quality of home country institutions," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2010035, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  4. Pedersen, Peder J. & Pytlikova, Mariola & Smith, Nina, 2004. "Selection or Network Effects? Migration Flows into 27 OECD Countries, 1990-2000," IZA Discussion Papers 1104, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Rauch, J E & Casella, Alessandra, 2001. "Overcoming Informational Barriers to International Resource Allocation: Prices and Ties," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt2k8626fr, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  6. James E. Rauch & Vitor Trindade, 1999. "Ethnic Chinese Networks in International Trade," NBER Working Papers 7189, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. J. M. C. Santos Silva & Silvana Tenreyro, 2006. "The Log of Gravity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 641-658, November.
  8. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Lafourcade, Miren & Mayer, Thierry, 2005. "The trade-creating effects of business and social networks: evidence from France," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 1-29, May.
  9. Frédéric Docquier & B. Lindsay Lowell & Abdeslam Marfouk, 2009. "A Gendered Assessment of Highly Skilled Emigration," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(2), pages 297-321.
  10. Mayer, Thierry & Zignago, Soledad, 2006. "Notes on CEPII’s distances measures," MPRA Paper 26469, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Kugler, Maurice & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "International labor and capital flows: Complements or substitutes?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 155-162, February.
  12. Keith Head & John Ries, 1998. "Immigration and Trade Creation: Econometric Evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 47-62, February.
  13. Javorcik, Beata S. & Ozden, Caglar & Spatareanu, Mariana & Neagu, Cristina, 2006. "Migrant networks and foreign direct investment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4046, The World Bank.
  14. Caglar Ozden & Christopher R. Parsons & Maurice Schiff & Terrie L. Walmsley, 2011. "Where on Earth is Everybody? The Evolution of Global Bilateral Migration 1960-2000," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 12-56, May.
  15. Docquier, Frederic & Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2004. "Measuring the international mobility of skilled workers (1990-2000) : release 1.0," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3381, The World Bank.
  16. Michel, BEINE & Frédéric, DOCQUIER & Maurice, SCHIFF, 2008. "International Migration, Transfers of Norms and Home Country Fertility," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2008043, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
  17. Dumont, Jean-Christophe & Martin, John P. & Spielvogel, Gilles, 2007. "Women on the Move: The Neglected Gender Dimension of the Brain Drain," IZA Discussion Papers 2920, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  18. Walmsley, Terri Louise & Winters, L. Alan, 2003. "Relaxing the Restrictions on the Temporary Movements of Natural Persons: A Simulation Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 3719, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Docquier, Frédéric & Rapoport, Hillel & Salomone, Sara, 2011. "Remittances, Migrants' Education and Immigration Policy: Theory and Evidence from Bilateral Data," IZA Discussion Papers 6104, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Frédéric Docquier & Çaǧlar Özden & Giovanni Peri, 2010. "The Wage Effects of Immigration and Emigration," NBER Working Papers 16646, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Julian di Giovanni & Andrei A. Levchenko & Francesc Ortega, . "A Global View of Cross-Border Migration," Working Papers 627, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  4. Capuano, Stella & Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2013. "African brain drain and its impact on source countries: What do we know and what do we need to know?," MPRA Paper 47944, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Frédéric DOCQUIER & Joël MACHADO & Khalid SEKKAT, 2012. "Efficiency gains from liberalizing labor mobility," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2012023, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  6. Docquier, Frédéric & Ozden, Caglar & Peri, Giovanni, 2011. "The Labor Market Effects of Immigration and Emigration in OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 6258, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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